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Fantasy Flight Games

 

Fantasy Flight Games

What a Marvel

Published 2 June 2020 | Marvel Champions: The Card Game

What a Marvel

A Closer Look at Ms. Marvel in Marvel Champions: The Card Game

Across the Marvel universe, every hero brings their own unique powers and personality—traits that set them apart from their compatriots and that help them to rise above the adversity thrown into their path. In Marvel Champions: The Card Game, these heroes come to life on your tabletop as you battle to thwart the villain’s dastardly schemes.

Today, guest writer James Phillips casts a special light on one of his favorite heroes: Ms. Marvel. If you’re considering picking up the Ms. Marvel Hero Pack or just wondering what this hero is all about, read on!

James Phillips Showcases Ms. Marvel

From the moment you open the Core Set of Marvel Champions: The Card Game, you’re given some of the most recognizable characters in popular culture today. Assuming you haven’t all been living under a rock for the past 20 years, you can probably hand your friend an Iron Man or Spider-Man deck, and be pretty confident that they’ll know who they’re playing. Likewise, Black Panther and Captain Marvel have had multi-million dollar movies in the past few years, helping to make the game even more recognizable and accessible.

However, Marvel Champions is a lot more than just a game about the Marvel universe. Within the Core Set, you also find some less familiar faces, like the She-Hulk hero, as well as various allies and enemies to face. Once you move beyond the Core Set and start adding expansions, the options get broader, and they will only grow with time. Today, I want to talk about who is probably the least well-known hero in this first wave of expansions, and tell you why she’s the best, why you should all be playing her, and why you should be reading her comics!

Who Is She?

Kamala Khan is a fairly ordinary teenager. She’s a first-generation Pakistani-American, living with her parents and her brother in Jersey City—balancing school, friends, and family, facing the challenges of growing up in a culture that is very different from the one her parents knew. Like many, she is obsessed with superheroes, particularly Carol Danvers—a.k.a. Captain Marvel, formerly Ms. Marvel. The twist in Kamala’s story (it’s in issue 1, so I’m not really spoiling anything) comes when a strange cloud descends upon the city, and Kamala finds herself gifted with superpowers. At first this includes shape-shifting, but it soon settles down into an ability to change her size—growing, shrinking, and stretching. As anyone familiar with superhero comics could predict, she decides to turn her new-found abilities to fighting crime, adopting the former alias of her idol: Ms. Marvel!

As much as we all love superhero films, superhero stories really work for me when they are driven by the characters, and Ms. Marvel is brilliant at this. I’d never actually read a Ms. Marvel comic before Christmas, but I started looking at a few in anticipation of her upcoming Hero Pack and ended up reading about 40 issues in a week! They have many of the standard set-piece punch-ups with bad-guys and monsters, but the driving heart of the story is Kamala trying not to grow apart from her friends and to balance the expectations of her family with becoming her own person.

Playing the Game

The struggles between her role as Ms. Marvel (Ms. Marvel, 1A) versus just being Kamala Khan (Ms. Marvel, 1B) are brilliantly captured in her hero design in Marvel Champions! Her Teen Spirit ability gives her extra card-draw, specifically targeting her fifteen-card hero set, and that set includes three support Personas that can only be used in alter-ego form—her brother Aamir Khan (Ms. Marvel, 6), and her friends Bruno Carrelli (Ms. Marvel, 7) and Nakia Bahadir (Ms. Marvel, 8).

Nakia is the most straightforward: a one-resource discount for the next card you play. Amir lets you return a card from your discard pile to the bottom of your deck and draw an extra card each turn, whilst Bruno offers exciting possibilities for more skilled and experienced players who are want to really push the envelope of what Ms. Marvel can do in a turn. These cards are crucial for getting Ms. Marvel working at peak efficiency, and the fact that you have to be Kamala rather than Ms. Marvel to use them is a great thematic fit (not to mention allowing her to have access to some effects that would be straight-up broken if she could use them without restriction).

Beyond these supports, Ms. Marvel relies heavily on events. At one Attack, one Thwart, and one Defense, her stats are nothing to write home about, but that’s okay because you’ll rarely be using them! Instead, she can exhaust to return an Attack, Thwart or Defense event to her hand, allowing you to keep cycling that key event round after round.

There are some really efficient cards here, and they only get more efficient once you get out her Shrink (Ms. Marvel, 11) and Embiggen (Ms. Marvel, 10) upgrades which let you increase the power of those Attack and Thwart events once per round, making Ms. Marvel an absolute powerhouse.

Building Ms. Marvel

Ms. Marvel’s pre-built deck came with Protection aspect cards in it, and like any of the Marvel Champions Hero Packs, it’s playable right out of the pack, combining reprints of Core Set staples with some powerful new cards like Energy Barrier (Ms. Marvel, 17). Personally though, my favourite way to play this hero is in Aggression or Justice!

In Aggression, Ms. Marvel gains access to powerful events like Melee (Ms. Marvel, 30). When you combo Melee with Embiggen, you can hit two enemies for five damage each—enough to clear sizeable minions as well as being a reasonable amount of damage for the villain. Of course, there are other heroes who can match or exceed this level of raw damage output. Ms. Marvel certainly doesn’t punch as hard as Thor. However, what makes Kamala unique is her ability to hit this hard at the same time as thwarting five threat per round with Shrink and three copies of Sneak By (Ms. Marvel, 4)

Likewise, in Justice, you can keep the villain’s ability to scheme well and truly suppressed, and if you add in more recent cards like Under Surveillance (Thor, 31), especially in low player-counts, then you’ll rarely have to worry about the scheme advancing when Ms. Marvel is on the case. Her pack even includes Concussive Blow (Ms. Marvel, 31) which allows you to confuse the villain—perpetually if you keep pulling it back to hand! Again, Justice allows Ms. Marvel to show what an all-rounder she is, combining strong threat management with punching someone for six damage with those Embiggened Big Hands (Ms. Marvel, 3).

Under Attack!

Of course, as Marvel like to remind us, whilst family and friends can be a hero’s greatest asset, they can also be a great weakness, and Kamala, like so many before her, finds herself in real peril when enemies uncover her identity and try to get at her through her friends. Her nemesis is Thomas Edison (Ms. Marvel, 27)—an evil clone of the famous scientist who accidentally got spliced with a parakeet (yes, really. Read the comics!) Edison only has three health, and does a single damage each round, but his three Scheme is something you need to keep an eye on. Of course, a minion is only a problem for as long as he stays in play, but Edison won’t be disappearing as quickly as it might seem, because he can’t take damage while you are engaged with any other minions. Obviously that will be harder in some scenarios than others, but even if you’re playing against a scenario without many minions, Edison brings a Giant Robot (Ms. Marvel, 28), an eight-health wall that can only be damaged if you spend a mental resource. I don’t want to spoil too much of the story behind Edison’s Generation Why? (Ms. Marvel, 26) side-scheme, but you’ll notice that this whole set is going to penalize you for having Persona supports, and do their best to neutralize the power of those cards that you do have in play.

If you weren’t excited about Ms. Marvel already, I hope that this article has helped. I’ve really enjoyed not only how much fun she is to play in the game, but the way that Marvel Champions has got me to explore a whole new corner of the Marvel universe.

James Phillips, or Mighty Jim, is a member of the Card Game Cooperative Podcast Team, and the writer of the Fistful of Meeples Blog. When he isn’t trying to keep up with three different LCGs and a toddler, he can be found playing D&D, or painting up miniatures for his board game collection such as Journeys in Middle-earth and Mansions of Madness. You can contact him via the Facebook pages for the blog or podcast, or by sending a DM to MightyJim#6786 on Discord.

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© MARVEL

Flying Solo

Published 29 May 2020 | Star Wars: X-Wing Second Edition

Flying Solo

Announcing an Open Alpha for Star Wars: X-Wing Solo Rules

“Right now, I feel I could take on the whole Empire myself.”
   –Dak Ralter, Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back

The starfighter battles of Star Wars™: X-Wing can range from small skirmishes between a few ships to epic battles involving multiple squadrons and capital ships. In all these battles, at least two players come together to play out these tense engagements with iconic ships from across the Star Wars™ saga.

Now, we’re working on an entirely new way to play out the space battles of the Star Wars galaxy, and we need your help! Fantasy Flight Games is happy to announce an open alpha for X-Wing Solo Play!

This new game mode gives you the chance to test your skills against a dynamic and unpredictable automated opponent whose behavior is dictated by simple rules using components found in the X-Wing Core Set. As these rules are still being developed, we need your help to test them. Throughout the development process, we’ll ask for your feedback using Google Forms.

Read on for more information on how you can play X-Wing solo!

Incoming Hostiles

At its core, X-Wing captures the tense moment-to-moment decisions starfighter pilots must make in the midst of a dogfight. The Solo Flight System attempts to maintain this feeling with rules for you to fly against ships that do not have a human controlling them: it generates maneuvers for them to select, reveal, and execute; guides their choice of actions and attacks; and informs their use of special abilities and upgrade effects.

Everything begins with the Solo ships—those controlled by the flight system—choosing a Tally, an object or ship they have spotted and are concentrating on. When they activate, a solo ship will select and reveal a maneuver on its dial from a chart based on its Tally’s location in one of its arcs and the results of an approach roll of one defense die and one attack die.

In addition to its approach, this die roll also determines a solo ship’s attitude for the upcoming engagement. Ships can have an offensive, balanced, or defensive attitude and, ultimately, this attitude will be used establish what actions and abilities a ship uses. For example, if no enemy ship is in its firing arc, a ship taking an offensive attitude will use its action to perform a boost, barrel roll, or rotate action that puts an enemy ship in its firing arc.

While the Solo rules can be used to play standard games of X-Wing, we recommend that you begin with an introductory scenario to get yourself acclimated to the rules. In this scenario, players take control of two sturdy ships such as T-65 X-Wings—one piloted by the highest initiative non-limited pilot and the other with the lowest initiative non-limited pilot—and begin play on one edge of a standard 3’x3’ play area.


The T-65 X-Wing is in its side arc, so the TIE/ln selects its slowest turn maneuver toward that ship.

Initially opposing you are are two patrolling ships such as TIE/ln Fighters placed at one of two randomly determined hyperspace markers. As the rounds progress, these patrol ships are aided by additional patrol ships and, eventually, more powerful reinforcement ships. If you can survive these waves and destroy the enemy ships, you win!

Fire Support

Most ships should be able to use these rules to function completely without player input. But we know that complicated situations can arise, usually due to a special ability or upgrade effect. Guidelines are included in these rules should these situations arise in your games, but we also want to hear from you. After your first game, you can contact us using this Google Form to provide your feedback. We look forward to hearing from you!

To get started, download the X-Wing Solo Play rules here! As always, full game rules and other support materials can be found on our Star Wars: X-Wing page. Good luck and have fun flying solo!

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© and ™ Lucasfilm Ltd.

The Return of House Sanctum

Published 29 May 2020 | KeyForge

The Return of House Sanctum

Austin Kukay on Sanctum in Mass Mutation

The Red Shroud will defend the Crucible from the threat of dark æmber.”
   –Berinon

As mutants run rampant on the Crucible and change threatens the very balance of the world, who better to save the day than the mighty knights of House Sanctum? Since their last appearance in Age of Ascension, Sanctum has added many new threats to their repertoire. Let’s look at how the strategy of House Sanctum has changed over time—and what to expect when you see them across the table in Mass Mutation.

A Glorious Beginning

House Sanctum’s tale began in Call of the Archons as one of the first Houses discovered on the Crucible. Sanctum’s original suite of cards largely focused on establishing board presence and maintaining it. With an above-average creature power and their added armor, they could go toe-to-toe with the giants of Brobnar or the beasts of Untamed without a care. Cards like Champion Tabris (Call of the Archons, 240) and Francus (Call of the Archons, 243) encouraged fighting to maintain the board (and to prevent your opponent from forging a key).

In addition to these creatures’ effects, cards like Shield of Justice (Call of the Archons, 225) and Take Hostages (Call of the Archons, 226) could be combined to both protect your creatures and capture even more of your opponent’s precious æmber. The protection theme continued with Bulwark (Call of the Archons, 238) and Champion Anaphiel (Call of the Archons, 239) as common cards, providing taunt and armor for your battleline. Healing was also prominent for House Sanctum in Call of the Archons; cards like Cleansing Wave (Call of the Archons, 215) and Protectrix (Call of the Archons, 254) could remove any damage that got through your creatures’ armor.

Sanctum’s strength as a house developed on the battleline—and it was supported by effects covering many areas of Keyforge play, from creature disruption in cards like Blinding Light (Call of the Archons, 213) to artifact destruction with cards like Gorm of Omm (Call of the Archons, 232). House Sanctum even had “house-cheating” cards like Inspiration (Call of the Archons, 220) and Sigil of Brotherhood (Call of the Archons, 236) and a “board clear” in The Spirit's Way (Call of the Archons, 229). Leveraging these diverse cards allowed Sanctum to support other houses by filling in weak points in your deck—both in your battleline and in your deck’s composition.

While many of the original rares of House Sanctum continued the themes found in the commons and uncommons, the Four Horsemen were notably sought-after for their unique playstyle and synergies. As a unit, the Four Horsemen were large creatures that could decimate an opponent’s board if left unchecked. They encouraged fighting, damaging, and destroying opponent creatures—all characteristics that synergized with the abilities and traits of other Sanctum cards in the set! With their identity established, House Sanctum returned in the following set, Age of Ascension, with new characteristics and strategies to use.

The Ascension of Sanctum

The next chapter in Sanctum’s story brought with it the introduction of a new keyword focused on the battleline. Of the five cards introduced in Age of Ascension with the deploy keyword, three of them were found in House Sanctum. "Lion" Bautrem (Age of Ascension, 211) and Challe the Safeguard (Age of Ascension, 216) bolstered your defenses anywhere you needed it while The Grey Rider (Age of Ascension, 226) let you use a friendly creature from any house to fight.

By using increased power from “Lion” Bautrem and Haedroth's Wall (Age of Ascension, 236), creatures like Maruck the Marked (Age of Ascension, 220) and Barrister Joya (Age of Ascension, 228) were able to fight with ease. If The Grey Rider wasn’t around to spur them into battle, Smite (Age of Ascension, 224) took the place of Inspiration from Call of the Archons to let you ready and fight with a friendly creature. Sanctum also retained their healing capabilities with Healing Blast (Age of Ascension, 219) and Golden Aura (Age of Ascension, 217). The inclusion of Hallowed Shield (Age of Ascension, 218) and Golden Aura with Potion of Invulnerability (Age of Ascension, 239), and Shield of Justice reprinted from the previous set meant that House Sanctum was able to continue taking on adversaries as they came. With Proclamation 346E (Age of Ascension, 261) added as a rare, Sanctum could further leverage board control into a way of controlling an opponent’s æmber and key forging, focusing on targets in play to meet the condition.

With Aubade the Grim (Age of Ascension, 213), Bordan the Redeemed (Age of Ascension, 215), and Baron Mengevin (Age of Ascension, 227), Sanctum continued their capturing theme, but added Equalize (Age of Ascension, 232) to further manipulate æmber. This proved to be quite strong when played against the upcoming Saurian Republic in the Worlds Collide set, forcing all of an opponent’s exalted æmber onto a helpless creature.

While capturing an opponent’s æmber, Sanctum could both prevent them from generating more æmber with Barrister Joya and Sir Marrows (Age of Ascension, 223) while generating æmber of their own with cards like Free Markets (Age of Ascension, 233) and Prince Derric, Unifier (Age of Ascension, 240). Creature-based disruption was also seen on The Vaultkeeper (Age of Ascension, 265), a rare reprinted in this set. This creature-based disruption is once again found in Sanctum’s suite of cards as we move closer to Mass Mutation, among other developments.

The Keepers of Order

With the villainous impurity of dark æmber being introduced to the Crucible, Sanctum rises to enforce order and righteousness. In Mass Mutation, creatures with the Mutant trait will be quite common. As such, you can expect to see many cards across the houses that are concerned with Mutants. For House Sanctum, this usually comes with cards targeting the Mutant trait, such as Gizelhart's Wrath (Mass Mutation, 163), which can destroy each Mutant creature!

In addition to the reprint of Champion Anaphiel (Mass Mutation, 129), House Sanctum is also seeing the inclusion of Ardent Hero (Mass Mutation, 126) and the rare card Lady Loreena (Mass Mutation, 165) as new creatures with taunt. Against many Mass Mutation decks, Ardent Hero will easily protect your board against large threats and Mutants alike, despite its lower power. If that isn’t enough protection for you, Lady Loreena will bolster your board incredibly—giving you four battleline spots “protected” by her Taunt and ability. You can expect bulky, protected boards from Mass Mutation Sanctum.

Sanctum also isn’t losing its ability to capture—those bulky boards will be protecting æmber captured from cards like Commandeer (Mass Mutation, 131), Bring Low (Mass Mutation, 147), and Font of the Eye (Mass Mutation, 134). These cards will add large amounts of captured æmber to your board, and with capture icons distributed throughout your deck by the new Enhance keyword, you’ll also see more consistency in your ability to capture. With Font of the Eye and cards like Lieutenant Gorvenal (Mass Mutation, 137), Gizelhart's Zealot (Mass Mutation, 136), and Lord Golgotha (Mass Mutation, 166), you can expect Sanctum to fight—and to capture plenty of æmber for doing so. Even a card combination like One Stood Against Many (Mass Mutation, 171) and Lieutenant Gorvenal could capture three æmber from your opponent in one turn!

While you’re not capturing from your opponent, you may need an answer to a different problem posed by your opponent. In Mass Mutation, the cards that you need will be more easily accessible. With cards like Orb of Wonder (Mass Mutation, 173) and Angry Mob (Mass Mutation, 143) in House Sanctum, you’ll be able to access those answers faster; either by directly searching for a card or by emptying your deck faster for a re-shuffle. While having the added speed and consistency will help catch up, House Sanctum also isn’t losing its disruption to slow your opponent down. With the return of Radiant Truth (Mass Mutation, 154) and the introduction of more creature-based disruption like Purifier of Souls (Mass Mutation, 174), you can force your opponent into tricky situations. Due to complex battlelines and powerful Destroyed: effects like that of Praefectus Ludo (Mass Mutation, 195) or Keyfrog (Mass Mutation, 369), each of these cards will see excellent use against the dark æmber threat.

Change is coming to the Crucible. Will you change with the Crucible and accept these new mutations? Or stand with House Sanctum, fighting for what is just and pure?

Whatever you decide, may your Æmber always shine bright.

Austin J. Kukay, or RealPlayerOne, is the creator and a writer at the The Epic Quest Blog and a member of the Moor Wolf Pack community-team. While he isn't searching for new Epic Quest decks, you can find Austin preparing for the next Vault Tour or finding new stories to tell from The Crucible. Austin supports organized play tournaments and events in his local Keyforge community in Seattle, Washington by creating tokens and trophies as prize support. You can continue the conversation with Austin on social media @TheEpicQuestKF. 

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The Sea and the Sun's Shadow

Published 27 May 2020 | Legend of the Five Rings LCG

The Sea and the Sun's Shadow

Read New Legend of the Five Rings Fiction

Tensions had grown tighter and tighter as they progressed further from the coast, nerves stretching like bowstrings. Oguri hoped they would reach their destination before any strings snapped.
  
–Annie VanderMeer Mitsoda, “The Sea and the Sun’s Shadow”

Rokugan’s border with the Shadowlands is a dangerous place at any time, and recent events have not increased its safety. Now, Yasuki Oguri sails with a Mantis crew to investigate the Watchtower of Sun’s Shadow, but none can predict exactly what lies in wait for them inside the watchtower’s walls. The encroachments of the Shadowlands may reach further than any samurai could know…

You can read a brand-new Legend of the Five Rings short story today— "The Sea and the Sun's Shadow" (1.2 MB) by Annie VanderMeer Mitsoda! This story is a direct follow-up to "A Game of Promises" (9.2 MB), and a continuation of the story choice made by the top Crab Clan player at Winter Court 2018.

Keep a close eye on our website for more Legend of the Five Rings fiction in coming weeks!

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By Imperial Decree

Published 22 May 2020 | Legend of the Five Rings LCG

By Imperial Decree

The Hall of Heroes and a Message from the Emperor

To all the honorable players of Legend of the Five Rings: The Card Game, we have two special announcements from the Emperor regarding Hatamotos. Read on to learn what exciting information His Imperial Majesty has deigned to share with the world!

Return of the Hall of Heroes

First and foremost, the Emperor is proud to announce the rebirth of the Hall of Heroes! For those who are unaware, the Hall of Heroes is a list of all the honorable warriors in the Emerald Empire who currently bear the title of Hatamoto. This list is broken up by clan and can be found below!

Hatamotos By Clan

Clan

Name

Date Earned

Crab

Alexander Dias

May 25, 2019

Crab

Aneil Seetharam

February 9, 2020

Crab

Chuck Clynes

December 8, 2019

Crab

Daniel Correas

September 22, 2019

Crab

Daniel Knauss

July 6, 2019

Crab

Darren Hazelden

May 31, 2019

Crab

David Hoyland

May 31, 2019

Crab

James Matthews

April 28, 2019

Crab

Jared Wright

August 2, 2019

Crab

Kontantinos Paltoglou

August 24, 2019

Crab

Max Williams

March 30, 2019

Crab

Michael McCormick

March 15, 2020

Crab

Nathan Beatie

August 3, 2019

Crab

Nuggetz

March 23, 2019

Crab

Pablo Pintor Espinosa

November 8, 2019

Crab

Panagiotis Xanthopoulos

May 4, 2019

Crab

Stephen Didion

November 8, 2019

Crane

Alain Laugier

May 31, 2019

Crane

Alessandro Apicella

September 22, 2019

Crane

Andrew Case

November 8, 2019

Crane

Augustine Shim

June 1, 2019

Crane

Anthony Newton

August 3, 2019

Crane

Dominik Klapper

July 6, 2019

Crane

Erik Baalhuis

May 31, 2019

Crane

Jeremy Bennet

April 28, 2019

Crane

Jeremey Campshure

August 2, 2019

Crane

Joey Goldstein

February 9, 2020

Crane

Julien G

March 23, 2019

Crane

Lukas Vogelgsang

August 24, 2019

Crane

Mike George

March 30, 2019

Crane

Nick Mason

May 25, 2019

Crane

Nicolas Simonpietri

July 6, 2019

Crane

Pablo Casares

August 24, 2019

Crane

Richard Perez

December 8, 2019

Crane

Tam Fullard

March 15, 2020

Crane

Yanik Richard

November 8, 2019

Dragon

Alex Jacobs

December 8, 2019

Dragon

Alvin Boschek

March 23, 2019

Dragon

Anthony Hunter Edwards

November 18, 2019

Dragon

Antonio Kittrell

February 9, 2020

Dragon

Benjamin Riehl

July 6, 2019

Dragon

Derek Copp

March 30, 2019

Dragon

Gunnar Traustason

May 31, 2019

Dragon

James Lewin

May 25, 2019

Dragon

Jasper Mangus

August 2, 2019

Dragon

Javier Querol

August 24, 2019

Dragon

Michele Carrieri

September 22, 2019

Dragon

Mike Alexander

August 3, 2019

Dragon

Neojko

August 24, 2019

Dragon

Nikos Androulakis

May 4, 2019

Dragon

Rik Hyde

May 31, 2019

Dragon

Robert Almgreen

March 15, 2020

Dragon

William Zhang

March 29, 2019

Lion

Aaron Boyd

November 8, 2019

Lion

Aric Logsdon

June 1, 2019

Lion

Brendon Stove

August 3, 2019

Lion

Charles Delux

May 25, 2019

Lion

Chris Pepe

February 9, 2020

Lion

Dario Perri

March 15, 2020

Lion

Dimitris Roumeliotis

August 24, 2019

Lion

Greg Durant

March 29, 2019

Lion

Jason Scarrow

November 8, 2019

Lion

Marios Bounakis

March 15, 2020

Lion

RY

December 8, 2019

Lion

Tim van der Staaij

March 23, 2019

Lion

Tobias Vater

July 6, 2019

Lion

Tom Nys

March 15, 2020

Phoenix

Ákos Hirt

September 22, 2019

Phoenix

Alexander Leong

February 9, 2020

Phoenix

Anthony Calabrese

March 30, 2019

Phoenix

Daniel Barker

March 15, 2020

Phoenix

Daniel Matteo

December 8, 2019

Phoenix

David Teva Moreno

August 24, 2019

Phoenix

Jacek Blonski

December 8, 2019

Phoenix

James O’Doherty

August 3, 2019

Phoenix

Jeremy Spencer

May 25, 2019

Phoenix

John Ferrell

March 29, 2019

Phoenix

Jose Luis Saenz

November 8, 2019

Phoenix

Matthew Beck

November 8, 2019

Phoenix

Mykael Dolph

June 1, 2019

Phoenix

Timo Johnson

July 6, 2019

Phoenix

Travis McDaniel

November 8, 2019

Phoenix

Vasilis Kirlis

August 24, 2019

Scorpion

Akis Chotemis

August 24, 2019

Scorpion

Brad Emon

August 2, 2019

Scorpion

Chris Pottorf

February 9, 2020

Scorpion

Erik Stenberg

December 8, 2019

Scorpion

Hamoun Iranmanesh

August 3, 2019

Scoprion

Jakub Irzyk

November 8, 2019

Scorpion

Kevin Ho

June 1, 2019

Scorpion

Liang Zhong

May 31, 2019

Scorpion

Luiz Bretas

May 4, 2019

Scorpion

Mario Blanco Alonso

May 31, 2019

Scorpion

Mark Armitage

August 2, 2019

Scorpion

Mat Frye

March 30, 2019

Scorpion

Matthieu David

July 6, 2019

Scorpion

Norbert Vincze

September 22, 2019

Scorpion

Paul Durant

March 29, 2019

Scoprion

Pietro Sebastiano Monari

September 22, 2019

Scorpion

Vincent Jolivet

March 23, 2019

Scorpion

Steve Palumbo

December 8, 2019

Scorpion

Tony Gleeson

March 15, 2020

Scorpion

Zachary Lowe

November 8, 2019

Unicorn

Alexis Chionis

May 4, 2019

Unicorn

Allen Fluck

February 9, 2020

Unicorn

Chris Hornsey

May 31, 2019

Unicorn

Christian Andersson Naesseth

December 8, 2019

Unicorn

Daniel Kaye

November 8, 2019

Unicorn

Eoin Dornan

March 15, 2020

Unicorn

Fernando Fernandas

December 8, 2019

Unicorn

Fernando Piqeras Mancebo

August 24, 2019

Unicorn

Romain "Nobu" Verdier

March 23, 2019

Unicorn

James Perrone

August 2, 2019

Unicorn

John Carico

June 1, 2019

Unicorn

Jonathon Tessmann

March 29, 2019

Unicorn

Kailam Dale

May 31, 2019

Unicorn

Mychal Edwards

November 8, 2019

Unicorn

Oskar Bladh

August 24, 2019

Unicorn

Paul Hallet

August 3, 2019

Unicorn

Stephan Klopfer

July 6, 2019

Unicorn

Terék Milán

September 22, 2019

Unicorn

Tim Scarrow

March 30, 2019

The Duration of the Hatamoto Status

In addition to the unveiling of the new Hall of Heroes, the Son of Heaven would like to make a special announcement:

As long-time players of Legend of the Five Rings: The Card Game will know, the noble Hatamoto status is earned through performing well at certain trials, such as Kotei events or the annual Winter Court. This title is prestigious, but it has also been temporary; once a year passed from the date on which the title was earned, the Hatamoto status was revoked. The player would then need to re-earn their title by proving themselves at another event.

However, due to the current time of crisis, the Emperor has decreed that, until further notice, all Hatamotos who earned their status from March 2019 onward will retain their titles indefinitely. This is because, with little chance to prove themselves during this chaotic period, His Imperial Majesty does not wish to dishonor his champions by taking away their Hatamoto status.

Staying Strong in These Trying Times

Finally, regardless of whether you are a bushi, courtier, or shugenja, the current state of the world has been difficult for everyone. In these trying times, it is important to keep our wits about us, and to remain steadfast and unified in the face of danger. Thus, we would like to conclude the Emperor’s message today with a simple plea: stay safe, take care of your loved ones, and keep the world kind.

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Changed by Dark Æmber

Published 22 May 2020 | KeyForge

Changed by Dark Æmber

Preview the Unexpected Alterations Found in Mass Mutation

The discovery of dark æmber has reshaped the entire Crucible, as its mutative power creates startling changes in every House. New abilities are developed, creatures grow far beyond their normal sizes, and even familiar faces may have developed into unnatural new forms. It’s a world of possibilities, each more unusual and interesting than the last, and it’s also the world of Mass Mutation, the fourth set of Archon Decks for KeyForge!

Even if you’re new to KeyForge, Mass Mutation is the perfect place to start playing. A single player can leap into the game for the first time with a Mass Mutation Deluxe Deck, which contains a 36-card, read-to-play Archon Deck along with the rules and tokens you need to play. Alternatively, you could join with a friend by picking up a Mass Mutation Two-Player Starter Set—which offers two unique Archon Decks, along with enough tokens for two players to track  their damage, æmber, and other effects.

But whether you’re just exploring the game now, or you’ve been playing since Call of the Archons, there is so much to explore and enjoy in the Mass Mutation set. Today, we’ll preview some of the game’s new Mutants and the strange new abilities wrought by dark æmber!

MUTANTS!

The entire face of the Crucible, along with countless creatures, have been altered by the advent of dark æmber. Many of these take the form of once-familiar creatures, such as Bot Bookton (Mass Mutation, 67) replacing Doc Bookton (Call of the Archons, 139). These new iterations invariably bear the Mutant trait, as do many of the other creatures in this set, including creatures with the new enhance keyword like Maleficorn (Mass Mutation, 40) and gigantic creatures like Deusillus (Mass Mutation, 244). These creatures are united by the Mutant trait, but is this connection a boon or a curse? As with many mutations, the answer can be both.

Each House has its own unique philosophy when it comes to Mutants, and that philosophy shapes whether some of their cards are beneficial or harmful to Mutants. Despite the Mutants among their own ranks, some Houses, like the Sanctum, take a rather dim view of Mutants, choosing to keep them off the board with cards like Burning Glare (Mass Mutation, 128) or Gizelhart's Wrath (Mass Mutation, 163). Similarly, while they may not be embarking on a crusade like House Sanctum, the Star Alliance can easily clear out a single Mutant with Particle Sweep (Mass Mutation, 327).

Some other Houses, however, are overjoyed for the chance to work directly with the Mutants and the new advantages that their mutations unlock. House Untamed, for example, wants to reward you for having more Mutants than your opponent. Trimble (Mass Mutation, 389) gives every Mutant creature skirmish, and while this boosts your opponent’s Mutants as well, it’ll certainly go better for you if you’ve been building an army of Mutants. Following that same thread, Vault's Blessing (Mass Mutation, 391) lets both players claim an æmber for each Mutant that they control, potentially skyrocketing you to victory on the power of your Mutants!

Logos is another House that’s eager to find out what these new Mutants have to offer. Professor Terato (Mass Mutation, 95) gives your Mutants a new Reap ability to keep your hand full of cards, while Mutagenic Serum (Mass Mutation, 91) lets you use all of your Mutants on a single turn. You may even destroy all non-Mutant creatures in play, simply by playing Krrrzzzaaap!!! (Mass Mutation, 90). It’s plain to see that if you can find a Mutant-focused deck that combines the powers of Untamed and Logos, your Mutants could be a force to be reckoned with. Just hope you don’t run into a deck allied with House Sanctum!

Enhanced with Great Power

The powerful changes coming with Mass Mutation are not limited to Mutants, however. With the new enhance keyword, any card can gain new bonus icons, setting it apart from other copies and making even the specific cards in your deck unique. There are four distinct bonus icons in Mass Mutation:

Æmber: When a card with an æmber bonus icon is played, you add that æmber to your pool.

Capture: When a card with a capture bonus icon is played, you capture one of your opponent’s æmber on any one of your creatures.

Damage: When a card with a damage bonus icon is played, you deal one damage to one creature in play.

Draw: When a card with a draw bonus icon is played, you draw a card.

How are these new bonus icons added into your deck? You simply need a card with the new enhance keyword, such as Mutagenesis Researcher (Mass Mutation, 325), Fission Bloom (Mass Mutation, 87), or Dark Queen Gloriana (Mass Mutation, 397). Unlike other keywords, the enhance keyword does all of its work when the deck is first generated. For example, when a deck including Fission Bloom is first generated, the enhance keyword triggers, and a draw bonus icon is added to a random card within the deck!

Ultimately, the enhance keyword brings an added layer of uniqueness to the decks in the Mass Mutation set. Every Archon deck was already unique and different from every other deck in existence. Now, however, individual cards can be enhanced with a combination of bonus icons that sets them apart even from other copies of the same card. It’s just one more way to push the uniqueness of every KeyForge deck with the Mass Mutation set!

Mutation Is Coming

Change is coming to the Crucible, and the decks that you discover are about to become more unique than ever before. Look for Mass Mutation at its wide release on July 10!

You can pre-order your own copies of Mass Mutation Archon Decks (KF09a) at your local retailer or online through our webstore today.

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It's All About the Flavor

Published 21 May 2020 | Marvel Champions: The Card Game

It's All About the Flavor

Thematic Deckbuilding in Marvel Champions: The Card Game

Whether you’re a veteran Marvel Champions deckbuilder, or you just play the pre-built decks, there’s something to be said for a truly thematic deck. With the cards already released for Marvel Champions: The Card Game, you can build some wonderfully evocative decks, calling up your favorite moments from across the Marvel universe. Today, guest writer Blake Powell shares some of his thoughts on how you can make your games of Marvel Champions even more thematic! 

Blake Powell on Moving Beyond Your Pre-Built Deck

This is my first time writing about Marvel Champions: The Card Game, and I am pumped! This game has been my savior during this time of isolation, as it provides one of the few ways I can disconnect from technology and play a tabletop game solo. As much as entertainment from a screen is great, having something hands-on that doesn’t use technology is a nice change of pace. 

For this article I wanted to focus on an idea that should interest seasoned players as well as casual players who just like playing the pre-built decks in Hero Packs, quite possibly because deck building just isn’t your thing. With that in mind, I thought an interesting way to go about building decks is to think about them in a thematic way according to the hero—or even the lore behind a hero, which is especially fun for those who are fans of the Marvel universe.  

One thing to note, I’ve made the assumption that your card pool contains all packs that have been released up to the Thor Hero Pack. If you are missing some of the cards that are mentioned, just see if you can find a substitute that has a similar concept, i.e. doing damage or thwarting!

Building a Theme

I actually wanted to kick things off with a villain scenario idea! Anyone who has played the game long enough knows that Rhino (Core Set, 94) is the true intro villain. That being said, I think the thematic flavor possibilities with Rhino are amazing! In The Green Goblin Scenario Pack, we were graced with a card pool to create a pseudo-Sinister Six encounter deck by adding in the Electro modular set (Power Drain), the Tombstone modular set (Running Interference), and the Scorpion modular set (A Mess of Things).

These plus the Standard modular set make for some fun thematic flavor, and that goes double if you choose Spider-Man as your hero. You could also add in Goblin Gimmicks if you want to make it wacky—I think that may dilute the encounter deck a little too much, but it’s still a fun possibility. I personally really enjoy playing around with the different modular decks and trying to create a great thematic/challenging encounter deck.

Another way to add some thematic flavor to your Marvel Champions experience is to use hero combinations that tie into one another in the Marvel universe. There are loads of possibilities here depending on the number of players, but even solo, you can play two-handed and utilize two heroes thematically this way. In fact, playing a two-handed solo game is always a great option when tackling certain villains, as sometimes it really helps to have the diversity of two aspects to truly thwart and defeat that particular villain. This also lets you test two deckbuilds at the same time and shows you how a deck plays in a multi-hero environment instead of just a solo scenario. You could even go one step further and use the lore of the Marvel universe to put together matchups between heroes and villains that have a history of facing off. For example, Iron Man vs. Ultron or Black Panther vs. Klaw.

Mixing Up Your Hero Deck 

Now, if you are looking to build some decks with thematic flavor, there are a few ways that you can usually go about it. The first is through the actual Marvel universe, taking characters that interact with one another and putting them together. This mainly uses a hero with various allies that have interactions within the Marvel universe and builds a deck around the connection. Another primary way to assemble a thematic deck is by combining traits on the cards, which will bring more support cards into the mix with those allies. Lastly, and this can be a really fun one, is to look at the card art, and use as many cards as possible that have art depicting your hero or allies. This is a great way to pull out cards you may not always use, but since it has that flavor of your hero or allies, you’ll include it and try to make it work in your deck. You’d be surprised at how forcing yourself to include a card may open up potential new combos you hadn’t considered before!

Now getting into the specifics of a thematic deck. The easiest one to create at this point in the game is an Avengers themed deck. The Avenger trait is almost a universal theme with pretty much all of the heroes, so you can choose which hero you wish to try for this Leadership aspect deck. The only caveat for this build is that you must have the Captain America Hero Pack, as most of the Avengers-themed cards are within this expansion. Plus, Captain America (Captain America, 1A) makes a great hero for the Avengers theme, since he’s prominently considered “the first” Avenger. 

Looking at this deck for the most part, it’s pretty consistent and uses any card that has something to do with the Avengers trait or can synergize with a deck built around allies, which is what the deck is all about. Consider this build more of reference point to start from, especially if you don’t like building decks, then swap in cards that you enjoy to play or have a thematic flavor you would enjoy.

For those of you who aren’t into deckbuilding as much and have been playing Marvel Champions right out of the box with the pre-constructed decks, this next section is for you. Although this deck does still have that flavor crossover through the card art, that isn’t the main goal of these builds. The idea is to expand what you might have already been playing and take it to another level. What I’ve done is to take some of those original pre-built decks and tweak the builds—mainly by adding extra copies of a card that’s already in the deck in exchange for thinning out the basic cards, which typically only have a single card included for these Core Set pre-built decks.

First up is Captain Marvel (Core Set, 10A)! This deck has the Aggression aspect, and with these adjustments, you’re really turning the aggression up to eleven here! A big swap in this build is removing Hulk (Core Set, 50) in favor of Valkyrie (Thor, 12) Hulk may be fun as a character, but if you don’t have the right resource distribution, he can really burn you, so Hulk is out for this. Another notable exclusion is Relentless Assault (Core Set, 53). I was testing against the Rhino deck that I described above, and that encounter deck is quite light on minions, so Relentless Assault holds less value and was replaced by Melee (Ms. Marvel, 30). If you’re playing against a minion-centric encounter deck like Ultron or Green Goblin, swap Relentless Assault back in, as you will see a lot more value from that card in those situations. 

There is also an upgrade here that is very specific to Captain Marvel, and that is Enhanced Reflexes (Ms. Marvel, 24). This provides a repeatable Energy resource, which is very beneficial for Captain Marvel. If you wanted to try out this Aggression aspect with another hero that utilizes a different specific resource, you can swap in one of the other Enhanced upgrades as a substitute. You would be surprised how well an aspect deck can swap into another hero with minimal changes, especially the Justice and Aggression aspects, which are both highlighted here.

Next up, we have Spider-Man (Core Set, 1A)! With the Justice aspect, this deck is very well rounded for solo play. In fact, that’s the great thing in general about the Justice aspect—it caters really well to solo play, especially if your hero has cards that can do a lot of direct damage to the villain, as the Justice aspect focuses on thwarting. This deck has quite a significant tweak from the Core Set pre-built deck, with a lot more combo potential and some amazing card art flavor! The Physical resource is a big part of some of the combos, so it’s the most printed resource in the deck. Tenacity (Core Set, 93) and Concussive Blow (Ms. Marvel, 31) use this resource, and both can be clutch in a game.

One really fun combo is using Invulnerability (Thor, 21) to give Spider-Man a Tough status card, then playing Great Responsibility (Core Set, 61) to prevent the threat from being placed on a scheme as well as the damage. Under Surveillance (Thor, 31) is also an auto-include for any Justice build! This card will always buy you some time and is a crucial card in my opinion. There is also one card that can be swapped into the deck based on the scenario you’re playing, and that is Followed (Captain America, 32). This is a situational card to me, similar to Relentless Assault in the Captain Marvel deck, so add this at your discretion, or just to experiment with how useful you find it!

Let the Building Begin

That pretty much wraps up this article. Hopefully, the thematic aspect is something you will look into and enjoy—even if you’re not a fan of deck building, this should give you some options to expand those original pre-built decks. One rule I find to be quite true with most card games, you’ll want to play a deck a few times to really get a feel for how it plays and to discover the potential card combos, so make sure you jam a few games to really get to know the deck. Until next time, EXCELSIOR! 

Blake Powell, or blvdPAPERFIGHT, is an avid Marvel Champions player. He uses the game as a way to disconnect from technology, and usually is playing solo as a way to wind down and enjoy some great Marvel flavor in an LCG format. Look for more content from Blake on his YouTube channel and on social media @blvdPAPERFIGHT.

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© MARVEL

Courtly Nets and Hidden Snares

Published 20 May 2020 | Legend of the Five Rings LCG

Courtly Nets and Hidden Snares

Read New Legend of the Five Rings Fiction Today

The court was his battlefield. Today, Shoju was his opponent. The Imperial Chancellor watched the Scorpion, the yearning sinews of his heart eager like a bowstring behind a nocked arrow.
  
–Mari Murdock, “Courtly Nets and Hidden Snares”

Bayushi Shoju reigns over Rokugan as the Imperial Regent, but his rule is not free from unrest. As conflicts between the Lion and the Unicorn continue to erupt, Kakita Yoshi sees an opportunity to pressure Shoju, undermining his rule and potentially exposing a fatal weakness. But as Yoshi lays his schemes, the question arises—has he also forsaken a path of honor and wisdom? Are the Crane any better than the Scorpion?

Read the next chapter in the unfolding story of Rokugan with "Courtly Nets and Hidden Snares" (1.5 MB), a new Legend of the Five Rings short story by Mari Murdock! This story follows the events of "Behind the Empty Throne" (6.1 MB) and "Wind Through Falling Leaves" (6.3 MB).

Keep a close eye on our website for more Legend of the Five Rings fiction in coming weeks!

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Play Together While Apart

Published 15 May 2020 | Arkham Horror: The Card Game

Play Together While Apart

Ideas for Playing Cooperative Games via Video Call

Though restrictions on social gatherings are beginning to ease in many parts of the world, it’s a safe bet that for many of us, playing tabletop games together in person might be tricky for a while. But that doesn’t mean that you don’t have any options for playing board games together—many games, especially cooperative games, lend themselves very well to playing over video chat!

Today, we’ll take a look at how you could play Arkham Horror: The Card Game during social isolation, but with a few minor tweaks, you’d be able to play many of our cooperative games, such as Arkham Horror: The Board Game, Eldritch Horror, The Lord of the Rings: The Card Game, Marvel Champions: The Card Game, and more.

The Setup

If you’re planning to start playing Arkham Horror: The Card Game over video chat, you’ll want to start by appointing one player as the Game Master. The Game Master can also be a player, but in addition to making decisions as a player, the Game Master will be responsible for maintaining the scenario and carrying out the players’ actions in a single, unified place.

The Game Master will need:

  • A copy of the scenario you are playing, with all necessary encounter cards.
  • The campaign log.
  • Doom and clue tokens.
  • Investigator token cards for all investigators playing.
  • A chaos bag, constructed according to the campaign specifications.
  • Their own investigator deck with health, sanity, and resource tokens (if the Game Master is playing).
  • A webcam that is not attached to a laptop or phone will be helpful for clearly displaying the game state to all players.

The players will each need:

  • Their own investigator deck.
  • Health, sanity, and resource tokens.
  • A chaos bag, constructed according to the campaign specifications.
  • A webcam (this could be just a laptop or a phone).

Before the scenario begins, the Game Master will completely set up the scenario on their side as if preparing for an in-person game, aligning the webcam so that the location cards, agenda and act deck, the scenario card, and any other components are clearly visible to all players. The players in their own homes will go through the setup process as usual, including shuffling their investigator decks, gathering necessary tokens, and drawing starting hands.

Together Across Dimensions

Once everyone is setup, you’ll be ready for the game to begin! The Game Master will read the flavor text from the campaign guide, and the first round begins. You can play Arkham Horror: The Card Game over video conference without making any changes to the core rules—the players will simply communicate their actions to the Game Master, who will move their investigator token card and perform other actions as necessary. The Game Master will also handle the actions of enemies during the Enemy Phase, doom and encounter cards during the Mythos Phase, and other upkeep as it becomes necessary based on the individual scenario.

Skill tests – Each player can make their own skill tests using their individual chaos bag, reporting the results to the other players and the Game Master so that all necessary consequences can be executed. Alternatively, you could play with a single chaos bag kept by the Game Master, who would make all necessary draws for the players.

Threat area – Inevitably during the course of a scenario, enemies will engage investigators and treacheries will be added to their threat areas. Since it’s impossible for the Game Master to pass these cards to the players to put into their threat areas, an easy solution is to leave those encounter cards at your location and place your investigator token card on top of them to denote that they are engaged with you / in your threat area.

Encounter card draws – When encounter cards are drawn, the Game Master will draw the encounter cards and read them out for the individual players. Players will make all of their own skill tests as usual. For certain cards that use the Peril or Hidden keywords, individual play groups should decide among themselves regarding the best way to handle these cards.

Start Playing Today

We may be physically apart from our usual gaming groups, but that doesn’t mean that tabletop gaming has to take a break. Hopefully we’ve given you a few ideas for how you could play Arkham Horror: The Card Game or another cooperative game with your friends using video calls, and we’re excited to hear your own solutions and stories from playing tabletop games during social isolation!

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© 2016 Fantasy Flight Games. Arkham Horror, Fantasy Flight Games, the FFG logo, Living Card Game, LCG, and the LCG logo are ® Fantasy Flight Games.

Prepared for the Worst

Published 13 May 2020 | Arkham Horror: The Card Game

Prepared for the Worst

A Guide to Solo Deckbuilding in Arkham Horror: The Card Game

When you find yourself pitted against the horrors of the Mythos, you may have a companion at your side—or even a few other investigators who will stand with you against terrors from beyond our dimension. But what happens if you find yourself all alone? Today, we welcome two Arkham Horror: The Card Game community members to share their experience and offer some tips on how to build your deck the next time you’re starting a solo campaign!

Vase and Nate on Building a Solo Deck

The air hangs thin. Your mind paces back and forth as your hands begin to clam up and your sanity weakens with the continuous shuffling of cardboard growing ever more vigorous betwixt your fingers. Your eyes gaze blankly at a familiar image and your heart begins to pound violently as you anxiously ask yourself. “Do I have enough weapons in my deck? How many skill icons should I have?”

Sweat begins to drip from your brow as you question more and more but find no answer. Paralyzed, your resolve cracks, and suddenly, the room and all of reality begin to spin around you, fading into the darkness from which it was born. Out of the darkness, a voice calls out to you… “Hey, are you done building your deck yet?”

There are many factors that go into deciding what cards to include in your deck—what investigator you’re playing, what campaign or scenario you're playing, what difficulty you're playing, etc. One of the biggest factors, and the focus of today's article, is the number of investigators playing. Whether you've decided to trek out into the jungle with a full party of investigators or spend a quiet night alone doing research in your study, the key to success in Arkham Horror: The Card Game lies in how you construct your investigator deck. Depending on the number of players, how you go about this construction can vary drastically.

In this article, we wanted to go over some general guidelines to consider when building decks for solo play. If your only experience is in three- or four-player games, solo Arkham Horror: The Card Game can almost feel like a completely different game. Playing alone requires your deck to manage every aspect of the game with at least some proficiency, which can burden even the most seasoned veteran. Hopefully, we'll be able to steer you in the right direction so you can continue chasing down cultists with (misplaced) confidence.

Any scenario in Arkham Horror: The Card Game can be quite demanding on a single investigator, requiring they cover all aspects of progression in the game. More often than not, however, investigators are not inherently well suited to handle everything, and may be lacking in some regard. Carolyn Fern (The Circle Undone, 1) can struggle to defeat enemies, while Zoey Samaras (The Dunwich Legacy, 1) may have a tough time discovering clues. This makes good deck construction essential to success. Regardless of the investigator you choose or the campaign you are going to face, when building a solo deck, there are three major questions you should ask yourself to decide what cards to include.

The Three Questions

1.) How will I get clues?

As the only player in the game, it's up to you alone to discover the clues needed to advance each act, so it’s critical that you have a way to reliably obtain clues. Seeker investigators, such as Mandy Thompson (The Dream-Eaters, 2) or Daisy Walker (Core Set, 2), can easily push their high intellect even further with asset or skill cards. Other investigators, such as Preston Fairmont (The Circle Undone, 3) or Zoey Samaras, are not so blessed in this department, so cards like Intel Report (The Secret Name, 111), Scene of the Crime (Threads of Fate, 103), and Drawn to the Flame (Core Set, 64) are great ways of getting clues without having to reach into the murky depths of the chaos bag.

No matter what investigator you’re using, most locations in the game only have one clue per investigator. Knowing this, you should prioritize reliably getting one clue per location over potentially grabbing many clues in one go. Using Mandy as an example, you're better off including a card like Magnifying Glass (Core Set, 30) or Flashlight (Core Set, 87) over the Fingerprint Kit (The Circle Undone, 24) in a solo deck. Scooping up clues quickly will ensure you complete the scenario before you run into too many enemies.


When you're playing solo, it's best to prioritize reliably getting a single clue from each location, such as with Magnifying Glass or Flashlight.

2.) How will I manage enemies?

Progressing through a scenario, you'll no doubt run into enemies that mean to do you harm. Knowing this, it's wise to come prepared for the worst… (joke in the article yet). While Guardians tend to excel at defeating enemies outright with their might and a .45 Automatic (Core Set, 16), investigators like Rita Young (The Circle Undone, 5), and "Skids" O'Toole (Core Set, 3) are better equipped to leave their foes in the dust. Each style of enemy management comes with its own strengths and weaknesses worthy of its own article, but unlike gathering extra clues, dealing extra damage is always welcome. A card like Deduction (Core Set, 39) can have limited value in a solo game, but a Vicious Blow (Core Set, 25) will likely be your saving grace when one of O'Bannion's thugs comes looking to rough you up. 

When dedicating cards to enemy management, it's generally a good idea to have at least some way to put down the game’s Elite enemies, as their defeat is likely necessary for victory. Sneak Attack (Core Set, 52), "I've got a plan!" (The Miskatonic Museum, 107), and Spectral Razor (Dark Side of the Moon, 201) are all great ways to ensure a good chunk of damage. How you go about dealing with your foes will ultimately depend on your choice of investigator and campaign. Just make sure you have the money to pay for all these things!

3.) How will I manage my resources?

No matter what investigator you’re building a deck for, you’ll likely need some way of generating additional resources to play your key cards. Certain investigators are better at accumulating resources (looking at you, Jenny and Preston), but thankfully there's always an Emergency Cache (Core Set, 88) hiding somewhere if you really need it. How much extra money you need depends on the “cost curve” of your deck, or the resource cost of all your cards. A deck packing Agency Backup (In the Clutches of Chaos, 274) and Shotguns (Core Set, 29) without a way to stockpile money will end up just committing those cards to skill tests. When deckbuilding, try to keep the resource count in your decks down as much as possible. It's unlikely the horrors of the Mythos will stand idly by while you attempt to collect resources.

While you may be the only player in the game that's not to say you’re without help. Allies such as Dario El-Amin (The Unspeakable Oath, 151), Dr. Milan Christopher (Core Set, 33), and David Renfield (Echoes of the Past, 112) can help fund your campaign as well as providing a healthy stat boost.  Another way to handle resource management is by using cards that reduce the cost of other cards. Uncage the Soul (The Path to Carcosa, 33) doesn’t generate resources, but it does allow you to play a Spell or Ritual from your hand and reduce its cost by three, making a Shrivelling (Core Set, 60) or Sixth Sense (The Wages of Sin, 158) free to play. Ever Vigilant (The Path to Carcosa, 23) and the newly revealed  On Your Own (Return to the Forgotten Age, 10) perform a similar function for Guardians and Survivors respectively. But there's another form of resource management to consider in solo play, and that is card draw.

Resources are only as useful as the cards you spend them on. You draw a card every upkeep phase, but that won't often be enough to keep a steady stream of cards flowing into your hand. Assets such as Rabbit's Foot (Core Set, 75), Lucky Cigarette Case (Core Set, 107), and Scroll of Prophecies (The Search for Kadath, 116) are great options for repeated card draw. Seekers are blessed with numerous draw events, such as Preposterous Sketches (Blood on the Altar, 186), No Stone Unturned (The Path to Carcosa, 26), and the powerful Cryptic Research (Core Set, 43), ensuring they never run out of cards. Cards that search your deck, like Prepared for the Worst (Blood on the Altar, 184), Calling in Favors (The Unspeakable Oath, 158), and Practice Makes Perfect (Dark Side of the Moon, 197), while not providing direct card advantage, do ensure that you find lynchpin cards for your strategy before the doom count runs out.

Venture Forth

How you answer all of these questions depends on your investigator, campaign, and difficulty you're playing on, but there’s one underlying thread for all these answers and that is tempo. Doom accumulates at the same rate regardless of player count, so being able to complete objectives quickly is critical when playing on your own. Ultimately, building decks for solo play in Arkham Horror: The Card Game is a challenging, yet rewarding experience. Building decks for co-op games? Well, that's a subject for another day…

Innkeeper Vase Odin
Innkeeper Vase Odin of the YouTube channel, "The Twisted Tentacle Inn," has been playing games for almost four decades, and in the past couple of years has been specifically enjoying Dungeons & Dragons and Arkham Horror: The Card Game. Born in Panama City, Panama, the Innkeeper knows his way around a good machete. Vase moved to the U.S. in 1984, and lived in the bug-infested sauna they call "Florida" for over 30 years. His interests include nature hikes, playing guitar, horror movies, comic books, board games, and creating content for his YouTube channel. His favorite Lovecraftian story is "The Thing on the Doorstep.” Vase now lives in Portland, Oregon with his wife Lua and their two savage beasts, Thor and Loki.

Nate, Lost in time and space
Nate, Lost in time and space, of the YouTube channel of the same name, is the "Tech guy" and "Editor" for the “Great Old Ones Gaming” podcast and website. Nate got into the Cthulhu Mythos in the early 2000s with the second edition of 
Arkham Horror: The Board Game, and from there it spiraled out of control. From that point, Nate began playing Mythos-based roleplaying games such as Call of Cthulhu and Delta Green. When not creating content, Nate likes to GM roleplaying games, write music, and cook (as a hobby and professionally) Now, Nate lives in New England with his wife and the rats in the walls.

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© 2016 Fantasy Flight Games. Arkham Horror, Fantasy Flight Games, the FFG logo, Living Card Game, LCG, and the LCG logo are ® Fantasy Flight Games.

Truth and Lies

Published 6 May 2020 | Legend of the Five Rings LCG

Truth and Lies

A New Legend of the Five Rings Short Story Is Now Available

Bayushi Yojiro remained solemn, his voice tinged with concern. “Dark clouds gather around Toshi Ranbo, my lady, and your arrival heralds even more uncertainty. For what purpose do we owe you the honor of your visit?”
  
–Katrina Ostrander, “Truth and Lies”

Ousted from the capital by Shoju, Bayushi Kachiko has been imprisoned within Toshi Ranbo, languishing with nothing left to manipulate. Yet this is the very city that Doji Hotaru now pushes toward, with an eye toward claiming a place for her armies to shelter. Can two souls become linked by destiny? And what will be the fallout of the unfolding confrontation—for Hotaru, Kachiko, Yojiro, and the entire Emerald Empire?

Fantasy Flight Games is proud to present "Truth and Lies" (2.5 MB), a new Legend of the Five Rings short story by Katrina Ostrander. This fiction serves as the conclusion to the trilogy begun in "Caged Birds" (2.4 MB) and continued with "Violence Behind Courtliness" (2 MB).

Keep a close eye on our website for more Legend of the Five Rings fiction in coming weeks!

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Beyond Our Dimension

Published 5 May 2020 | Arkham Horror: The Card Game

Beyond Our Dimension

Introducing a Parallel Investigator and a Challenge Scenario for Arkham Horror: The Card Game

“I have always believed that such strange, inaccessible worlds exist at our very elbows, and now I believe I have found a way to break down the barriers.”
  
–H.P. Lovecraft, “From Beyond”

Since the earliest days of Arkham Horror: The Card Game, your investigators have remained unchanged. Though some investigators have had replacement signature cards released in conjunction with Arkham Horror novellas, the investigators themselves remained unchanged. But what if a parallel dimension lies close by our elbow—a place just slightly turned askew from our own existence?

Now, with the introduction of parallel investigators to the game, you have the chance to peer behind the veil. Today, Fantasy Flight Games is proud to present Daisy Walker as the first parallel investigator for Arkham Horror: The Card Game, along with Read or Die, a special challenge scenario designed specifically to highlight Daisy Walker as a side story in your campaign or as a standalone scenario.

The Librarian

Daisy Walker (Parallel Investigators, 1) has been embarking on your campaigns since the days of the Core Set, and she makes her entrance here as the first new parallel investigator. She still has much in common with her original version (Core Set, 2), including many shared stats and a focus on collecting powerful Tomes that can give you the advantage in any scenario. But whereas our familiar Daisy Walker builds a consistent advantage over the entire scenario by giving you free actions to spend on Tomes, the parallel version of Daisy delivers one single game-changing moment—when you trigger the action ability of every Tome you control as a free action!


Click to enlarge!

The parallel version of Daisy Walker also mixes up your deckbuilding options —although she’s losing her ability to draw freely on lower-level Mystic cards, she gains the potential to pull any Tomes in the game into her deck. And, perhaps best of all for aspiring deckbuilders, you’re free to mix and match between the original and the parallel investigator cards. In other words, you could use each individually, or use the original front and the parallel back, or the parallel front and the original back!

Alongside the new parallel investigator, you’ll find advanced versions of Daisy’s two signature cards— Daisy's Tote Bag (Parallel Investigators, 2) and The Necronomicon – John Dee Translation (Parallel Investigators, 3). You can use these cards with any form of Daisy Walker, and they each represent heightened versions of her signature cards—far more beneficial in the case of Daisy’s Tote Bag and far more dangerous in the case of The Necronomicon. You can upgrade Daisy’s signature cards to the advanced version at any point in the campaign—but they must be upgraded as a set, so you can’t take the improved tote bag without the Necronomicon.

Read or Die

The books and tomes found scattered across the Arkham Horror Files universe serve many purposes. Many offer vital and encyclopedic information, while others provide solace in a world beset by horror. But some books hold eldritch secrets contained within, and this dark knowledge may be enough to set the entire world off-kilter.

No matter which version of Daisy you prefer to play, you can show off her talents in a brand-new challenge scenario, Read or Die. As you embark on this scenario, a specter from Daisy’s past rises once more as Dr. Armitage summons you to the Orne Library. Something has been unleashed on Miskatonic University, and it’s up to you to stop it.

This scenario can be played in standalone mode or included as a side story in your campaign—but you can only play Read or Die if Daisy Walker is one of the investigators in your party and she has at least four Tome assets in her deck. In addition to the new cards included as part of the Read or Die print-and-play scenario, you’ll need a copy of the Core Set and The Dunwich Legacy deluxe expansion to play this scenario!

Looking Past the Cover

Force your way into an alternate dimension with the parallel investigator version of Daisy Walker and the Read or Die scenario. Will you face the dark secrets of Daisy’s past in order to shape her future? You can download the cards (33 MB) and the rules insert (7.5 MB) today!

Start your next campaign of Arkham Horror: The Card Game with Daisy Walker and look for new parallel investigators to emerge in coming months!

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© 2016 Fantasy Flight Games. Arkham Horror, Fantasy Flight Games, the FFG logo, Living Card Game, LCG, and the LCG logo are ® Fantasy Flight Games.

The Time for Mutation

Published 1 May 2020 | KeyForge

The Time for Mutation

An Update on the Release Plans for Mass Mutation

In the midst of social isolation and the unfolding COVID-19 pandemic, we are continuing to evaluate our upcoming product release schedule with primary attention paid to the safety and health of our employees, retail partners, and communities of players.

As the United States, Europe, and much of the world continue to shelter in place, the English release of the Mass Mutation set for KeyForge is currently planned as a global release in July, though we will continue to adjust this as we evaluate the best time to reopen Organized Play.

However, China and Taiwan are now emerging on the opposite side of their outbreaks and quickly making a return to normal life. Gamers in these countries are gathering again, holding events in stores, and eager to see new releases hit the shelves.

Because of this unique situation, we have made the decision to release the Chinese localization of KeyForge: Mass Mutation into these markets on the originally planned release date of May 29. Although we always prefer simultaneous global releases, we believe that this is our best way to support our global community of gamers.

Thank you for your understanding and your patience as we all move forward through this time together!

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The Innsmouth Conspiracy

Published 30 April 2020 | Arkham Horror: The Card Game

The Innsmouth Conspiracy

Announcing the Sixth Deluxe Expansion for Arkham Horror: The Card Game

“You can bet that prying strangers ain’t welcome around Innsmouth.”
  
–H.P. Lovecraft, The Shadow Over Innsmouth

Order your own copy of The Innsmouth Conspiracy at your local retailer or online through our website today!

Not far from Arkham, the stooped and weathered town of Innsmouth squats on the Atlantic coast. An aura of decrepitude and decay hangs over the city like the ocean fog, from the weirdly glowing windows of the Gilman House to the deserted and toppling Fish Street bridge. Beyond the city limits, the Innsmouth shoreline is pocked with half-flooded tidal tunnels and unnatural coves. Who knows what strange, abyssal trinkets you might find, among the skeletons of fish and rotting seaweed?

Fantasy Flight Games is proud to announce The Innsmouth Conspiracy, the sixth deluxe expansion for Arkham Horror: The Card Game and the beginning of a brand-new campaign for one to four players!

The Innsmouth Conspiracy invites you to take your first steps in a twisting, time-jumping tale, starting with the campaign’s first two scenarios included in this expansion. From the heart of Innsmouth itself to the torturous coastline and beyond, these scenarios tee up an adventure that will continue to unfold across the subsequent six Mythos Packs. Far from including just two new scenarios, however, The Innsmouth Conspiracy brings five new investigators to the table with an undersea trove of player cards to support new types of decks—along with new mechanics for players to sink their teeth into, including keys, flood tokens, bless tokens, and curse tokens!

Call of the Deep Ones

You awaken in dull, throbbing pain, trapped in a smooth stone chamber. Kelp dangles from the ceiling and a rhythmic drip echoes through the cave. You have no memory of how you arrived here, but you know you have to get out. The tides may be rising, and deep within the tunnels that surround your pit, you can hear an awful croaking and gurgling…

From the very first scenario in this deluxe expansion, horrifying creatures shadow your footsteps as you search for a way to escape. Yet the memories slowly resurfacing in your mind may be more horrifying still as you find your thoughts casting back to the Innsmouth Look (The Innsmouth Conspiracy, 106) sported by many of the town’s residents. Though Deep Ones lurk beneath the waves and creep through wave-carved passages, within Innsmouth itself you must contend with the Cultists and Hybrids belonging to the Esoteric Order of Dagon. Your search for answers will lead you across Innsmouth and beyond, but the Memory of Oblivion (The Innsmouth Conspiracy, 98) may become more lethal than your current amnesia.


To plumb the hidden knowledge of the Fish Graveyard, you must clear its clues and obtain the red key token!

This campaign also introduces keys and flood tokens to the game for the first time, introducing an added layer of interactivity for any scenario. For instance, as you trek through the tidal tunnels beneath Innsmouth, you may find yourself in a Fish Graveyard (The Innsmouth Conspiracy, 49)—a location that will only reveal its secrets, hidden within a pile of fish guts, once you’ve removed all of the clues and found the red key somewhere in the scenario. You must be quick with your search, however, as these tunnels are prone to flooding. While flood tokens offer no inherent effects, a card like Awakening (The Innsmouth Conspiracy, 42) means you won’t want to hesitate for long in a fully flooded location.

A Blessing or a Curse?

As the inhabitants of Innsmouth grow pallid and ichthyic, the chaos bag itself is also shifted with the introduction of bless tokens and curse tokens. A host of player cards in this expansion introduce and interact with these new tokens, yet few investigators have the opportunity to interact with bless tokens to the same extent as Sister Mary (The Innsmouth Conspiracy, 1), a new arrival to your team in this deluxe expansion. Sister Mary adds two bless tokens to the chaos bag during setup, and she’ll add another one at the end of every round—and when she draws the elder sign token!

Unlike a standard chaos token, bless tokens like those provided by Sister Mary don’t provide a final answer to your skill test—they merely push you closer to success. When you draw a bless token, you apply +2 to your test, but the bless token is then removed from the chaos bag and you must draw another token. This may seem like the perfect way to stock the chaos bag in your favor, but you must take care lest Sister Mary should suffer a Crisis of Faith (The Innsmouth Conspiracy, 7). Crisis of Faith could lead to your chaos bag becoming filled with curse tokens, the other new type of token now slipping into the chaos bag. As the dark reflection of a bless token, each curse token applies –2 to your test when it’s drawn, before being removed from the chaos bag and forcing you to draw another token.


When you draw a bless token, you'll apply +2 to your test result and draw another token. Similarly, a curse token applies –2 to your test result before you draw another token.

Though Sister Mary may specialize in bless tokens, every class will have new cards in The Innsmouth Conspiracy and throughout this cycle that invite them to seek bless tokens or tempt fate by dabbling with curse tokens. Seekers may be tempted to delve into secrets best left untouched with a Cryptic Grimoire (The Innsmouth Conspiracy, 22), a Tome that draws your investigator down a dark path before you can translate it. Or perhaps, you’ll cast a Ward of Radiance (The Innsmouth Conspiracy, 31), a shield against the darkness of the Mythos, that may allow you to cancel a treachery card for free—provided you are fortunate. No matter which aspect you prefer to use, you’ll have plenty of ways to harness the new bless and curse tokens.

Riptide!

The tides are rising, and the waves crashing against the Innsmouth docks have much to hide beneath their gray-green surface. Can you untangle your own memories from the dark threads that entangle Innsmouth and threaten to drag the city beneath the waves?

Look for The Innsmouth Conspiracy (AHC52) to release early in the fourth quarter of 2020! You can pre-order your copy through your local retailer or online through our webstore today!

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© 2016 Fantasy Flight Games. Arkham Horror, Fantasy Flight Games, the FFG logo, Living Card Game, LCG, and the LCG logo are ® Fantasy Flight Games.

Violence Behind Courtliness

Published 29 April 2020 | Legend of the Five Rings LCG

Violence Behind Courtliness

Read New Legend of the Five Rings Fiction Today

“Sadly, I am not here simply to arrange weddings, but to prepare for a war. While General Daidoji Uji retakes Kyūden Kakita, we will press on against the Lion and the Castle of the Swift Sword, where we can lay siege to them with our Unicorn allies. But first, we must reassert our claim over Toshi Ranbo.”
  
–Katrina Ostrander, “Violence Behind Courtliness”

The chill of winter is fast approaching, but this is no season for rest or hesitation. If the Crane Clan would avoid defeat, Doji Hotaru must plot the path forward for the Crane—and even if they choose to reassert their claim over Toshi Ranbo, how exactly will they bypass the countless dangers that wait on every side?

To discover Doji Hotaru’s choice, and its ramifications for those within Toshi Ranbo, read "Violence Behind Courtliness"  (2 MB), a new Legend of the Five Rings short story by Katrina Ostrander! This story is a direct sequel to last week’s story: "Caged Birds" (2.4 MB), also by Katrina Ostrander.

Be sure to check the Fantasy Flight Games website frequently for more Legend of the Five Rings fiction!

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Into the Jungle

Published 27 April 2020 | KeyForge

Into the Jungle

Investigating the KeyForge Sealed Format

If you’re unfamiliar with KeyForge, you may not immediately know that the game offers two distinct formats—Archon and Sealed. In the Archon format, you carefully choose the deck that you’re going to use, drawing on your full collection and picking the deck you want to play. When you play Sealed, however, you’re put in the pilot’s seat of a brand-new deck you’ve never played before, challenging you to very quickly determine your deck’s strengths, weaknesses, and unique strategies.

Today, guest writer Austin Kukay joins us to discuss the Sealed format, and the best ways to quickly analyze and evaluate your deck—some tips that may help you out the next time you’re playing Sealed!

Austin Kukay on Evaluating Your Deck in the Sealed Format

Richard Garfield, the creator of KeyForge, has famously compared the game to a jungle; since KeyForge is a Unique Deck Game, you have to work with what you have. You have the opportunity to make those cards shine like no one else, because you're the only one in the world with that specific combination of 36 cards. The game has always had a huge focus on discovery—finding new cards and new ways to use your cards, a sentiment that’s pushed into higher gear with the upcoming Mass Mutation set. To maximize your discovery and really feel the excitement of “the jungle,” there's no better way to play KeyForge than the Sealed format.

The Sealed format in KeyForge requires a slightly different set of skills compared to the Archon format. In an Archon game, you get time to evaluate your opponent's deck and plan ahead for its intricacies. Do they have cards that can easily stop your game plan? Do you need to adjust your plans to succeed? Archon tests your skills in evaluating your opponent's decklist, your card knowledge, and your understanding of the deck you brought to the table. The Sealed format undoubtedly tests your card knowledge, but also your ability to adapt on the fly and learn as you go. It challenges you to be prepared for what's coming or be ready to respond at a moment's notice. Can you understand your own deck before even playing a single game? Can you learn what went well and improve from match to match? Can you anticipate the cards and combos your opponent may be trying to pull off?

While every player in the game has their own methods of evaluating a decklist (and sometimes it can be exciting to see what each person discovers through evaluating), I wanted to share some of the methods I use while staring down a brand-new deck at a Sealed competition. I'll be analyzing a new Worlds Collide deck from the perspective of the Sealed Solo variant (for more information on the different KeyForge variants, click here), but each of the other Sealed variants hold their own important strategies. Let's jump into it!

Rustriver, the Doctor Doctor

Assuming we're only playing against Worlds Collide, the first thing I look at is my deck's name and Houses. For the deck today, I have Rustriver, the Doctor Doctor, a deck composed of Dis, Logos, and Star Alliance. Knowing the Houses, I usually consider what I can project the composition of the deck will be. Dis tends to be quite disruptive and destructive, Logos efficiently gets you through your deck, and Star Alliance works well with other Houses and tends to have plenty of upgrades to go around. Let's see how that holds up for the Doctor Doctor.


What cards do you notice first?

In a Sealed competition environment, you want to find lines of play in your deck before the first match so you can test your strategy early and refine it. My recommendation to find these lines is to start by looking at the rare cards and the cards with multiple copies in the deck. Cards with multiple copies add consistency to a unique deck, while rare cards present less frequent combinations. For Doctor Doctor our rare cards and cards with multiples are:

Rares Multiples

Outside of this, I recommend paying special attention to any Special and Variant rarities (usually linked cards or different versions of a card), Mavericks (cards outside of their normal House), Legacies (cards from previous sets), and Anomalies (potential cards from future sets) to guide your analysis. All of these cards are also great advantages in the Sealed environment because they’re unexpected.

Using these cards as guides, you can start to find connections and themes across Houses. For example, starting with Universal Keylock and We Can ALL Win in Doctor Doctor, we can see that this deck has many cards that allow us to manipulate the opponent’s key cost.

We Can ALL Win is a tricky card to play correctly, since the key cost is lowered for yourself and your opponent till the end of your next turn. This is where these other key increases can help, since you can increase your opponent’s key cost while keeping yours low. Taking this line of play further, the Doctor Doctor also has Obsidian Forge (Worlds Collide, 93). This card is known as a “key cheat,” since it lets you forge a key outside of the “Forge a Key” step at the beginning of your turn. The deck also has Poltergeist (Worlds Collide, 94), which allows you to both use an artifact in play AND destroy it.

This means one potential line of play you could follow is playing We Can ALL Win while Universal Keylock is in play, bringing your opponent’s key cost to seven (or up to nine again if you play Sensor Chief Garcia (Worlds Collide, 305) as well). Then, on your next turn you can use Poltergeist to destroy your own Universal Keylock to reduce your key cost, followed by using Obsidian Forge to key cheat. Whoa!

Now, this is an extremely specific line of play, requiring at least four cards to work (not to mention creatures in play for Obsidian Forge). While this may not happen in the three-to-four games you play at your Sealed competition, this is just one direction you could take the deck. The beauty of Sealed is that your opponent doesn’t know your decklist. At the same time, you are also still trying to learn how to play your list! Following this line of play would be more risky or more obvious in an Archon format, but it has a chance in a Sealed format to catch your opponent off guard. You can choose just about any cards in the decklist or a couple of those “focus cards” from earlier and investigate a line of play around them.

After contemplating some directions I can take the deck, I like looking at the “stats” of the deck. By this I mean looking at the counts of card types and the card characteristics. For example, the Doctor Doctor has the following stats:


These stats include CALV-1N (
Worlds Collide, 308) and Explo-Rover (Worlds Collide, 297) as creatures.

Considering the stats can help us learn a couple things about the deck. Firstly, with sixteen bonus æmber in the deck, you would only be short two æmber for your three keys if you played every card once (and your opponent did nothing to stop you) without having to reap! On average, decks normally have around ten bonus æmber, so this is quite a bit higher! We can also tell that the deck has a slightly lower than average creature count (average is ~18) and a below average total creature power (average is ~68).

Notably, it’s also important to consider the overall shape of the set you’re playing. In Worlds Collide, creature characteristics are important. Sometimes you’ll stare down huge Saurian Republic dinosaurs or bulky Brobnar giants, so having a board that can stick around can be very beneficial in these situations. Looking back at the deck, while many of the creatures are small, there are many ways to protect them, like with Armsmaster Molina and Titan Guardian (Worlds Collide, 141).

In contrast, when playing in the Call of the Archons set, your action count, your ability to generate æmber, and your ability to control your opponent’s æmber (typically through stealing or capturing) were more important characteristics to track. While these are still important to consider, it’s important to shift your analysis strategies and priorities depending on the set you’re playing.

After considering the many lines of play and continuing my analysis further, I arrive at this final game plan for Rustriver, the Doctor Doctor:

My plan is to control the opponent’s board with damage while disrupting their play and decisions with the many disruptive cards. While my creatures are small and few, I can keep them alive with the protective cards in the deck. My æmber control primarily relies on increasing the cost of my opponent’s keys, but I can attempt to out-race my opponent with bonus æmber and plenty of draw and archive cards. I need to be careful with my rares, Wild Wormhole, and Mini Groupthink Tank, for they can all be very strong plays or devastating for me

With that said, this is just one interpretation of Rustriver. KeyForge decks have a lot of depth. Depending on your playstyle and knowledge about the game, you and a friend can see something completely different in a deck. Even from game to game you can see something new in a deck and continue to discover interesting plays and strategies that the world has never seen. But the only way to learn a jungle’s secrets is to explore it… so get exploring!

Cheers, and may your æmber always shine bright.

Austin J. Kukay, or RealPlayerOne, is the creator and a writer at the The Epic Quest Blog and a member of the Moor Wolf Pack community-team. While he isn't searching for new Epic Quest decks, you can find Austin preparing for the next Vault Tour or finding new stories to tell from the Crucible. Austin supports Organized Play tournaments and events in his local KeyForge community in Seattle, Washington by creating tokens and trophies as prize support. You can continue the conversation with Austin on social media @TheEpicQuestKF.

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The Highwayman

Published 24 April 2020 | Legend of the Five Rings RPG

The Highwayman

Download the Legend of the Five Rings RPG Gen Con Adventure

The Shinomen Mori—a gargantuan, sprawling forest, blanketing much of western Rokugan with its primeval spread. Beneath the shadow of its canopy, countless mysteries lie undisturbed, but the Shinomen can also be a place of great darkness, as the Shadowlands Taint festers and takes root. Within this forest, nothing is as it seems, but this is where your path leads in a new adventure.

Fantasy Flight Games is proud to present The Highwayman, a new adventure for Legend of the Five Rings Roleplaying that’s free to download from our website today!

The Shadow of the Forest

The Highwayman debuted at Gen Con 2019 as a one-shot adventure that we hosted in some of our roleplaying game sessions, and now, we’re happy to make it widely available to every Game Master who’s interested in running the adventure themselves.

Unlike the grand majority of your adventures in Legend of the Five Rings Roleplaying, The Highwayman is not an adventure designed for a party of samurai in the service of their Great Clans. Instead, you’re invited to play as gaijin foreigners, rōnin, and peasant characters, experiencing a radically different side of life in Rokugan and drawing on many of the new rules and options introduced in the Path of Waves sourcebook.

At the beginning of your adventure, you’ve spent several months working small jobs for Ito Moronoka, a simple merchant. His latest job for you will certainly pay well at six koku apiece—and that’s for simply tracking down an absent courier and some missing sake. You set out for the small town of Kawacho, but when the trail leads into Shinomen Mori, you can be certain that things will not end as simply as they began…

You can run this adventure for your own group today by downloading the adventure (10 MB) from our website! You can also find the pre-generated character sheets (10 MB) that we used at Gen Con. Finally, we’ve provided a series of handouts (1.3 MB) to accompany your adventure and draw your players deeper into the unfolding story.

Even if you’re isolating, running roleplaying games online is an easy way to connect with your friends and family. You can find the Legend of the Five Rings Roleplaying Core Rulebook online through DriveThruRPG today!

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Caged Birds

Published 22 April 2020 | Legend of the Five Rings LCG

Caged Birds

New Legend of the Five Rings Fiction Is Now Available

Now, Kachiko was nothing. Nobody. She’d dropped the strings. Now, there were none left to pull.
  
–Katrina Ostrander, “Caged Birds”

Bayushi Kachiko, Imperial Advisor and Mother of Scorpions, has fallen far from her high position. After disputing with Shoju in the aftermath of the Emperor’s death, she has been exiled to Toshi Ranbo, far from the Imperial City of Otosan Uchi, and held under house arrest for treason. Now stripped of everything she once held close, what is Kachiko’s road forward from this point—and where might that road lead?

Fantasy Flight Games is proud to present "Caged Birds" (2.4 MB), a new Legend of the Five Rings short story by Katrina Ostrander! This story follows directly from the events arising in "Black and White"  (317 KB).

Be sure to continue to keep an eye on the FFG website for more Legend of the Five Rings fiction!

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Play KeyForge for Free

Published 16 April 2020 | KeyForge

Play KeyForge for Free

Four Mass Mutation Decks Are Now Available to Print and Play

For most gamers in the United States and many countries around the world, social isolation has limited our access to regular tabletop gaming. Even though upcoming FFG releases have been delayed, we still wanted to share some of our most exciting upcoming products with you—starting with the Mass Mutation set for KeyForge!

If you’ve never played KeyForge, this Unique Deck Game from renowned game designer Richard Garfield puts you in a head-to-head race to summon your creatures, gather the mysterious substance known as æmber, and forge three keys before your opponent. Unlike many other card games, every deck in KeyForge is algorithmically generated, drawing from a common cardpool to offer a unique, fixed deck that’s unlike any other deck in existence, with card combinations and strategies that only you can master.

Mass Mutation is the newest set of Archon Decks for KeyForge, introducing the mutative effects of dark æmber to the Crucible, along with billions upon billions more completely unique decks. Drawing from a cardpool of 422 cards, Mass Mutation brings over 250 brand-new cards to your decks. You’ll find strange new versions of familiar characters, massive creatures that stretch across more than one card, and the triumphant return of House Sanctum.

Whether you’re completely new to KeyForge or you’re eagerly awaiting the release of Mass Mutation, you can get your first taste of the new set for free today!

The Mutation Begins

Fantasy Flight Games is proud to present four new KeyForge Archon Decks, each drawn from the Mass Mutation set and now available for you to download and start playing! Important note: All files are the property of Fantasy Flight Games and may only be used for personal and private purposes. All forms of commercial operation are excluded.

In conjunction with the deck PDFs above, you can find the Mass Mutation quickstart rules here (2.9 MB). If you’re a KeyForge veteran, that should be all you need to start playing, but if you’re new to the game, you’ll want to grab a few proxy tokens. You can print off our token sheet ( Side A , 23 MB – Side B , 23 MB) for paper tokens, or simply grab some common household items!

Keys: The objective of the game in KeyForge is to be the first player to forge three keys—and as such, you’ll need to proxy three keys per player! These keys can be anything that has two distinct sides to represent unforged or forged keys, but we recommend using coins as a proxy that’s easily available, small in size, and has two distinct sides.

Damage and Æmber: The other common game elements that you’ll want to track with proxy tokens are damage and æmber. You can use any kind of small token to track damage and æmber, and we suggest using dice (six-sided or otherwise) as a space-efficient way to keep track of how much damage has been taken by a creature or how much æmber you’ve collected.

Status Effects: Some cards can cause status tokens, such as stun, ward, or enrage. You shouldn’t need many of these tokens—just a handful of unique tokens from another game in your collection that you can use as stand-ins should be sufficient!

We hope that you enjoy playing with these Mass Mutation decks and that they bring some more fun and entertainment to your social isolation! We’re looking forward to releasing the full Mass Mutation set later in 2020.

Download these four Mass Mutation decks today, and pre-order your own Mass Mutation Archon Decks (KF09a) at your local retailer or online through our webstore today!

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Update: COVID-19 & FFG OP

Published 15 April 2020 | Organized Play

Update: COVID-19 & FFG OP

An Update for All Events Regarding COVID-19

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to evolve, Fantasy Flight Games is dedicated to making sure everyone involved with our games remains safe and healthy during this time. After evaluating the ever-changing situation, we are extending the suspension of all Organized Play activities.

At this time, store-level Organized Play events should be postponed until September 1 and scheduled Premier level events such as Grand Championships, KeyForge Vault Tours, the Legend of the Five Rings Kotei Series, and the Star Wars™: X-Wing  System Open Series are suspended until July 29 and will be rescheduled when possible. We will continue to monitor the state of the pandemic and will always prioritize the safety of our staff and community. We are working on rescheduling as many of our events as possible, but will continue to defer to health experts for when it is safe to resume public gatherings, so dates and status of events could change.

The additional events have been postponed or cancelled:

Star Wars: X-Wing System Open Series

KeyForge
Vault Tour

Legend of the Five Rings Kotei and Grand Kotei

Origins Game Fair (CANCELLED)

Origins Game Fair (POSTPONED)

Origins Game Fair (POSTPONED)

Tilburg, Netherlands (POSTPONED)

Tilburg, Netherlands (POSTPONED)

 

Hannover, Germany (POSTPONED)

Hannover, Germany (POSTPONED)

 

Bankstown Sports Club, Australia (POSTPONED)

   
 

In the meantime, we hope that everyone stays safe and healthy. Please stay tuned to our website, social media channels, and our retailer newsletter for updates as we provide them.

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