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Ken and Robin Live from Gen Con 2017

Sep 22 2017

Climb into your time machines and set the dial to Indianapolis. It’s Ken and Robin Live from Gen Con 2017!

Surprise Outcomes in DramaSystem

Sep 18 2017

In my last Page XX column I promised a rule for a rare instance of procedural resolution. This occurs when the caller of the scene wants to be surprised by the outcome of an external event. I admit to being surprised that people want this, but it turns out that a few groups do. It does fit certain genres where the group works together toward a common goal that regularly repeats itself. This might apply to series set in the worlds of sport, the arts, or around other occupations.

In the standard procedural system seen in Hillfolk, you fail more frequently than you would in a standard adventure-oriented RPG. Compelling drama arises from failure, from the tightening of the screws on the characters. So the system skews to that, just as action and investigation games like GUMSHOE and 13th Age favor success.

By contrast, the Surprise Outcome resolution option outlined below assumes a 50/50 shot of success, which you can calibrate in whichever direction you prefer to allow for the desired possibility of surprise.

Surprise Outcome Procedural Resolution

The caller poses a yes or no question about a possible procedural outcome:

“Will Chessboard win the race, beating Percival’s horse?”

“Will our band have a great gig?”

“Will this be the time when one of the firefighters gets hurt?”

The caller then draws a card from a freshly shuffled deck. If the result is an 8 or higher, the answer to the question is Yes. If not, the answer is No.

When the card is revealed, the scene caller narrates accordingly, then frames the dramatic interaction arising from it.

A surprise procedural outcome never counts as a scene unto itself. It is always a prelude to a scene.

Callers seeking additional complication can specify any card as the target to hit, allowing adjustment of the odds upwards or downwards from roughly even. (Well, 54%, but this is DramaSystem so who’s counting?) I’m not sure why you’d bother to call for a surprise and then skew the odds to lessen the chance of having one, but there you go. Each card represents a difference in odds of roughly 7%. So if you want a 21% chance of success, make the target a Queen or better. For a slim 21% chance of failure, make it a 5 or better.

DramaSystem doesn’t use dice or coins or spinners but if you’d rather substitute a randomizing method of your choice, it is unlikely that the Great Pelgrane will swoop from its perch in Clapham Common to devour you.

Ken and Robin Talk About Stuff: All the Cute Girls are Capulets

Sep 15 2017

In the latest edition of their ENnie-winning podcast, Ken and Robin talk death spirals, summer movies and occult Kashmir.

13th Age Character Builds: Flying Daggers Monk

Sep 13 2017

THE MONK

By ASH LAW

In this series by ASH LAW, we feature two different builds for every 13th Age character class, at all levels. ASH suggests how the builds might be used, and offers tips on playing each character. Stats are based on the point-buy method, and the characters have no non-standard elements.

 

THE MONK

 

The mighty monk: never unarmed because their fists (and feet, and foreheads) are weapons. Wielding the power of ki, monks are by default also fighting with two weapons. Monks don’t make weapon attacks, nor unarmed attacks like other classes—instead they make special attacks known as Jab, Punch, and Kick attacks. You also use attack forms (opening, flow, finishing) that grant AC bonuses (+1, +2, +3). As the combat progresses you cycle through forms, dealing damage for Jabs, Punches, and Kicks.

As a monk expect to be very mobile on the battlefield, but be careful not to get too far ahead of the rest of the party. You should also expect to track ki, work out which forms to use and when, and to know when to activate your ki powers. This class has a lot of moving parts to track and isn’t for those who prefer a simpler combatant.

 

FLYING DAGGERS MONK

 

Download the Flying Daggers Monk character sheets here.

 

This monk is all about battlefield mobility, with access to ranged attacks that add extra flexibility to the build. When using your attacks (opening, flow, finishing) pick ones that allow you to pop free if you are engaged, or ones that grant extra movement, or that allow you to fly.

This monk isn’t exactly fragile, but works best when it is darting from foe to foe and avoiding getting bogged down, so don’t be afraid to pull back and make ranged attacks when monsters are too tough for you to face one-on-one.

 

Talents

 

Temple Weapon Master

Turn misses into hits when you are fighting with a weapon that fits your style, which for this build would be throwing stars, arrows, etc.

Heavens Arrow

You have no penalties for using ranged weapons, and you can sometimes make ranged attacks in place of melee attacks as part of your fighting forms.

Leaf on the Wind

Gain extra move actions, fall without damage by using nearby handholds to slow you, and sometimes you fly.

 

Race

Halflings have the neat evasive and small powers that lets them dodge through battles—perfect for a flying daggers monk.

 

Attributes

Wisdom gives us ki, Dexterity and Strength are important for attacks, and Constitution is needed for hit points—the monk needs to be a balanced character. Fortunately the monk gets two +2 attribute bonuses from its class, instead of the usual one!: Str 16 (+3) Con 14 (+2) Dex 16 (+3) Int 10 (0) Wis 16 (+3) Cha 10 (0).

1st level

Attributes: Str 16 (+3) Con 14 (+2) Dex 16 (+3) Int 10 (0) Wis 16 (+3) Cha 10 (0).

Racial Power: small, evasive

Talents: temple weapon master, heavens arrow, leaf on wind

Feats: ki

Ki: 1

Ki Powers: supreme warrior discipline, wind from heaven, wind’s comrade

Attack Forms: claws of the panther (panther spins free, cat cuts between hounds, twinned panther claws), three cunning tricksters (fox senses weakness, monkey taps the shoulder, crane summons carp)

 

2nd level

New feat (leaf on wind), ki (6), ki powers (supreme warrior discipline, wind from heaven, wind’s comrade), attack forms (claws of the panther (panther spins free, cat cuts between hounds, twinned panther claws), three cunning tricksters (fox senses weakness, monkey taps the shoulder, crane summons carp)).

 

3rd level

New feat (heavens arrow), ki (6), ki powers (supreme warrior discipline, wind from heaven, wind’s comrade), attack forms (claws of the panther (panther spins free, cat cuts between hounds, twinned panther claws), three cunning tricksters (fox senses weakness, monkey taps the shoulder, crane summons carp), dance of the mantis (springing mantis strike, the pincer whirls shut, precise mantis kick)).

 

4th level

+1 to three attributes (Strength, Dexterity, Wisdom), new feat (precise shot), ki (6), ki powers (supreme warrior discipline, wind from heaven, wind’s comrade), attack forms (claws of the panther (panther spins free, cat cuts between hounds, twinned panther claws), three cunning tricksters (fox senses weakness, monkey taps the shoulder, crane summons carp), dance of the mantis (springing mantis strike, the pincer whirls shut, precise mantis kick)).

 

5th level

New feat (ki), ki (7), ki powers (supreme warrior discipline, wind from heaven, wind’s comrade), attack forms (claws of the panther (panther spins free, cat cuts between hounds, twinned panther claws), three cunning tricksters (fox senses weakness, monkey taps the shoulder, crane summons carp), dance of the mantis (springing mantis strike, the pincer whirls shut, precise mantis kick), rising phoenix (rising phoenix fist, becomes the pillar of flame, life burning fire fist)).

 

6th level

New feat (leaf on wind), new talent (improbable stunt), ki (7), ki powers (supreme warrior discipline, wind from heaven, wind’s comrade, ludicrous improbability manoeuvre), attack forms (claws of the panther (panther spins free, cat cuts between hounds, twinned panther claws), three cunning tricksters (fox senses weakness, monkey taps the shoulder, crane summons carp), dance of the mantis (springing mantis strike, the pincer whirls shut, precise mantis kick), rising phoenix (rising phoenix fist, becomes the pillar of flame, life burning fire fist)).

 

7th level

+1 to three attributes (Strength, Dexterity, Wisdom), new feat (heavens arrow), ki (8), ki powers (supreme warrior discipline, wind from heaven, wind’s comrade, ludicrous improbability maneuver), attack forms (claws of the panther (panther spins free, cat cuts between hounds, twinned panther claws), three cunning tricksters (fox senses weakness, monkey taps the shoulder, crane summons carp), three evil dragons (the burning shadow, blue lightning fist, red fury), rising phoenix (rising phoenix fist, becomes the pillar of flame, life burning fire fist)).

 

8th level

New feat (leaf on wind), ki (8), ki powers (supreme warrior discipline, wind from heaven, wind’s comrade, ludicrous improbability maneuver), attack forms (claws of the panther (panther spins free, cat cuts between hounds, twinned panther claws), three cunning tricksters (fox senses weakness, monkey taps the shoulder, crane summons carp), three evil dragons (the burning shadow, blue lightning fist, red fury), rising phoenix (rising phoenix fist, becomes the pillar of flame, life burning fire fist), feathered serpent (coils dispense blessings, feathers on talons on scales, poisoned heaven kick)).

 

9th level

New feat (heavens arrow), new talent (abundant step), ki (8), ki powers (supreme warrior discipline, wind from heaven, wind’s comrade, ludicrous improbability maneuver), attack forms (claws of the panther (panther spins free, cat cuts between hounds, twinned panther claws), three cunning tricksters (fox senses weakness, monkey taps the shoulder, crane summons carp), three evil dragons (the burning shadow, blue lightning fist, red fury), rising phoenix (rising phoenix fist, becomes the pillar of flame, life burning fire fist), feathered serpent (coils dispense blessings, feathers on talons on scales, poisoned heaven kick)).

 

10th level

+1 to three attributes (Strength, Dexterity, Wisdom), new feat (abundant step), ki (8), ki powers (supreme warrior discipline, wind from heaven, wind’s comrade, ludicrous improbability maneuver), attack forms (claws of the panther (panther spins free, cat cuts between hounds, twinned panther claws), three cunning tricksters (fox senses weakness, monkey taps the shoulder, crane summons carp), three evil dragons (the burning shadow, blue lightning fist, red fury), rising phoenix (rising phoenix fist, becomes the pillar of flame, life burning fire fist), spiral path (the cycle opens, spiral ascension widens, star joins as ally), feathered serpent (coils dispense blessings, feathers on talons on scales, poisoned heaven kick)).

Ken and Robin Talk About Stuff: Mom! He’s in Cisalpine Gaul!

Sep 8 2017

In the latest episode of their globe-trotting, problem-solving podcast, Ken and Robin talk Magic Blackwater, serial killer as vampire, Stacy Dellorfano and Caracalla vs Geta.

New See Page XX out now!

Sep 5 2017

The latest edition of See Page XX is out now! Featuring The Persephone Extraction, a new adventure collection for Night’s Black Agents; The Howling Fog, the first Vivian Sinclair PDF adventure for Cthulhu Confidential, plus The Yellow King RPG playtesting, Mythos themed cocktails, and how to choose the best flavour of GUMSHOE for your preferences.

It’s all in this month’s See Page XX!

See Page XX – August 2017

Sep 5 2017

Page XX logo (2015_04_01 16_53_09 UTC)

Gen Con is over, and we’re catching our breath after our biggest event of the year. We had a great Gen Con 50, and a big shout-out to the team involved in pulling together such a cracking anniversary event.

We had a super productive Pelgranista get-together in Indianapolis in advance, and have big plans for the rest of the year. Other highlights were winning the Indie Game Developer Network’s Indie Groundbreaker Award for Game of the Year for Seven Wonders, our story game anthology (get 15% off with this month’s bookshelf offer), and two runner-up awards for Best Art and Game of the Year for #Feminism. We had a bit of a rest during this year’s ENnie Awards, and were happy to sit and watch Ken and Robin pick up their fourth win for KARTAS, Bubblegumshoe picking up Best Family Game, and of course, Chaosium’s well-deserved ten awards. Congratulations to all the winners in both awards!

New this month, we have the pre-order draft of The Persephone Extraction, a five-adventure collection for Night’s Black Agents. We’ve also got the first Vivian Sinclair adventure for Cthulhu Confidential; called The Howling Fog, it sees our tenacious reporter go undercover in the sleazy clip joints of New York City, investigating some mysterious mob deaths. We’ve also got Cthulhu City and Out of the Woods

New Releases

Articles

13th Age

See Page XX Poll

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post's poll.

The Wizard-Sorcerer

Sep 5 2017

[Author Roland Rogers is a 13-year-old 13th Age player whose One Unique Thing is that he Knows All the Monsters. Inspired by ASH LAWS character builds, here is a dual-class character created at all levels.]

In 13th Age, dual class characters can be much more powerful than single class characters. This is not always true -a Ranger-Wizard is more powerful than a Ranger, but a Commander is more powerful than a Commander-Fighter.

There are many good combinations, and each are good at different things, but the Wizard-Sorcerer is easily the combination that does the most damage.

Download the character sheet files here.

Play style

This Wizard-Sorcerer is built for combat.

You do have enough hit points to take quite a lot of damage but generally, because of your low AC, you should stay back, and stay behind your more armoured allies. The main point of this combination is to do as much damage as possible, although you do have a lot of non-damage spells, such as Confusion, Sleep, Shield and Haste.

Since you have so many spells, many o fwhich are daily spells, you don’t have to save your best spells for the most important battles. If you do run out of daily spells, just use Ray of Frost or Magic Missile.

You have the spell Shocking Grasp which can be done every round as a quick action. It’s a gamble, because you have to move over and engage the enemy, but if you hit, you pop free automatically. It’s good for finishing off a weak target, or wearing down a stronger target quickly.

If there is an enemy magic-user, you have counter-magic to stop their spells.

Use infernal heritage in an important battle each day to roll 2 D20s per attack, and get more out of your numerous daily spells.

Benefits

You have around twice as many spells if you were only a wizard, or only a sorcerer, even though some of them are a level lower.

With the Adventurer feat for Sorcerer dual class, once per day you can spend an action to gather power for a wizard spell and then evoke it, for example if a 1st level Acid Arrow does 4d10 damage, then gathering power would make it do 8d10 damage, and evoking would make it do its maximum possible damage, so it would be 80 damage at 1st level. Additionally, with spells like Force Salvo that have more than one attack, each bolt at third level will do 80 damage, and you get 5 bolts.

You get the high MD of a Wizard (12) and the good PD of a Sorcerer (11).

At 1st level, you get twice as many spells and no disadvantages.

You have the utility spells of a Sorcerer (Unearthly Glamour, Dragon’s Leap) and the utility spells of a Wizard (Levitate, Feather Fall) so there isn’t much you can’t do.

At 10th level, you can gather power, and then cast an evoked Meteor Swarm, which for 2-4 rounds will attack a group of enemies in the battle for 400 damage.

Disadvantages

You get the next level of spells a level late, and you will generally have some weak spells, for example at 10th level, you still have one 5th level spell.

You have a low armour class and physical defence.

You have high hit points, but low recovery dice, so you are likely to run out of recoveries if you take lots of damage.

August 2017: View from the Pelgrane’s Nest

Sep 5 2017

Gen Con 50 is over, and we’re catching up on all the work it’s generated. Gen Con also acts as a magnet for new releases, so we’ve got a bunch of those, too.

The 13th Age Bestiary 2, Cthulhu City and Out of the Woods are all off pre-order and are available, shipping now. A new Cthulhu Confidential  adventure – The Howling Fog – is also out now, and if you pre-order The Persephone Extraction for Night’s Black Agents, you can get the plain text, linked version now. Finally, the  Eyes of the Stone Thief Limited Edition – get one of only 100 copies which are gold-foiled, and beautifully bound in a green faux leather cover, with a signed bookplate from the author.

GUMTHEWS

At Gen Con we announced a new game by Emily Dresner and Kevin Kulp, code-named GUMTHEWS. It’s been under development for a while. It’s a game in which you track down malign sorcerers or wage a secret war against rival faction which features, heroism, sly politics and bloody death. It adds social combat to GUMSHOE as well as sorcery and niche protection for classes.

Gen Con 50

We began with the pre-Gen Con Pelgrane summit, in which we planned the year to come. Among our decisions were to close down the forums, connect with the kids on Twitch to promote our games, and discussed some heresies in order to promote critical thinking. One thing that came out of this was a comment that professional GUMSHOE leaves writers nowhere to hide so it exposes the quality of the adventure design more. It’s not that it’s harder, it’s just harder to disguise weaknesses. Another exercise we performed was to suggest words each person associates with Pelgrane (good and bad). Readers are welcome to offer their own words under the article.

Stand set up and put down was at its slickest, with artist Rachel Kahn wrangling us all. She’s an old hand at exhibitions, and has dealt with children, which apparently helped in managing the Pelgrane crew. Our sales were the second best ever, topped only by 2014, which saw the release of multiple 13th Age books. Our top-seller was Cthulhu Confidential, with the 13th Age Bestiary 2, #Feminism and Cthulhu City close behind. I was concerned before I arrived that the convention hall would be overcrowded, but with the Lucas Oil Stadium open, too, it was manageable. To celebrate the 50th Anniversary, Gen Con head honcho Peter Adkison set up a museum celebrating the history of roleplaying in the Stadium.

While Ken and Robin Talk About Stuff and Bubblegumshoe received ENnie awards, this year belonged to Chaosium and John Wick, who occupied the stage for most of the event. Seven Wonders won the Indie Groundbreaker Award for Game of the Year, while #Feminism was up for Best Art. On the Saturday evening, Kevin Kulp ran a playtest of a new game, codenamed GUMTHEWS, a Conan-esque baroque fantasy. The highlight for me was Gareth’s creepy sorcerer, who used leeches to perform his magic, and gave them all names.

Development

13th Age: Rob Heinsoo has been working on the outstanding 13th Age books. The Book of Demons and Fire and Faith manuscripts are due in the next few days, with the Book of Ages due at the end of October.

Cthulhu Confidential: Following the recently released The House Up in the Hills for Dex Raymond, the first stand-alone Viv Sinclair adventure Ex Astoria is being copy edited by former Pelgrane intern Will Jobst.

Trail of Cthulhu: Out of the Woods is hot of the press and available in the store, as is Cthulhu City. Fearful Symmetries is being edited, post playtest. We’ve just reprinted Trail of Cthulhu.

The Yellow King RPG: You can currently still back the Yellow King Kickstarter here. The first draft of all books is 67% complete. You can also apply for the playtest here.

The Fall of Delta Green: The final manuscript for Fall of Delta Green has been approved, and will go into art direction and layout next.

Roll 20 and the Black Book Character Generator

Roll20 are working on adding GUMSHOE to their online play platform, starting with Night’s Black Agents and Trail of Cthulhu. We are in early discussions replace the Black Book character generator with something which offers equivalent functionality at a minimum, with premium paid-for features.

I’ll leave you with Cthulhu endorsing Cthulhu City. What finer recommendation is there than that?

See Page XX: Stripping Down DramaSystem Procedural Resolution

Sep 5 2017

a column on roleplaying

by Robin D. Laws

When characters in DramaSystem want to accomplish something practical, external to their emotional goals, the full procedural system seen in Hillfolk allows you to narrate a detailed scene around that. It determines not only what ultimately happens, but lays down a series of suspense beats along the way.

The system’s default assumption is that you will use this only rarely. Mostly when you want something practical to happen, the scene caller just describes it happening:

“The village is on fire and the Horseneck tribe are riding through, pillaging! I go to Tallbeard to urge him to renounce his vow of non-violence and lead the charge to drive them off!”

“Ann has altered the library into a vast black labyrinth and locked out all the students. Doc, who she did not see over by the study carrels when she wove the spell, comes over to complain.”

“Chessboard, Asim’s horse, wins the third race by a nose. Asim approaches Percival, hoping for congratulations.”

Only in two cases would you bother to treat these changes to the ongoing situation as anything other than a fait accompli:

  1. Not everyone in the group agrees that this should happen
  2. The caller wants to be surprised by the outcome (a rare case I’ll deal with in a later post)

The original procedural system as seen in Hillfolk serves as something of a Rorschach test for player group culture. Of the groups who’d rather use an alternate, some want the procedural system to behave even more like a traditional RPG resolution system. Others want to set aside the suspense of the current system in favor of the quickest possible answer to the question at hand.

Here are two options for those belonging to that second camp: one simpler, one way simpler. They let you dispense with the red, yellow and green procedural tokens entirely, stripping the game down to two resource types: drama tokens and bennies.

They also assume that there is no such thing as a scene consisting only of a procedural action. Here, the procedural only serves as a prelude changing the conditions before the real meat of the scene, a dramatic interaction.

This removes the option of calling a procedural as a way of ducking the commitment of placing your character in yet another emotional situation. As with so much else in the highly personal play experience DramaSystem provides, this might be a plus or minus, depending on the tastes of your particular players.

The GM checks to see how many players care about the outcome, and what they want to happen. The caller draws two cards from a freshly shuffled playing card deck; each other player who cares one way or the other draws a single card. The GM does not take part. Players may spend bennies to draw additional cards. Each card costs one bennie. After everyone has had a chance to draw as many cards as they wish to pay bennies for, the players begin turning them over.

You could:

  1. have all players whose characters are taking part in the action flip over all cards at once. The player with the highest card describes what happens.
  2. narrate the ups and downs of each card outcome.

The first choice, Quick Narration, cuts to the chase, giving you a speedy outcome so you can get right back to the drama.

The second, Suspense Narration, draws out the suspense, getting you a little closer to the set-piece action/thriller sequence feeling the established procedural system permits.

Ties between cards of the same value, as always, resolve using this suit order, from best to worst: Spades, Hearts, Diamonds, Clubs.

In either case, the outcome a player wants might be the opposite of their character’s desires. This happens when your plans as author and the motivations of the character contradict each other. Ava the player might want to see the situation shaken up by a successful enemy raid on the village, even though her character, Ashwind, doesn’t want any such thing. When you’re rooting for the group to get into more trouble, you might well narrate bad stuff happening that your character either fails to stop or is not directly involved in.

In both of the following examples, Ava, Bob and Carla think it’s more interesting to let the Horsenecks successfully raid the village, with Darius, Emily and Fran hoping to see them driven off. Ava is the caller.

Quick Narration Example

Ava draws two cards. Darius, who plays Tallbeard and doesn’t want to be put in this position, pays a bennie to draw an extra card. Everyone turns their cards over at once. The highest card is the King of Spades, drawn by Emily. She narrates:

“The village may be on fire, but we rally and send the Horsenecks packing without Tallbeard’s having to draw his sword. His vow remains intact.”

This requires Ava, who is still the caller, to revise her intention of the scene. Her character, Ashwind, still goes to Tallbeard. Now, however, she uses a bit of tribal reverse psychology, congratulating him on training the others so that his own hands don’t get bloody any more.

Suspense Narration Steps and Example

In Suspense narration, the caller reveals the first card and describes a step in the action that goes her way. Then you go around the room from the caller’s left with each other player who wants to influence the outcome revealing his cards in turn. With each card reveal the player turning a card over describes:

  • a step toward his desired outcome (if this card is the highest so far, or if the highest card so far has already been drawn by a player driving the story toward the same outcome)
  • a step away from the desired outcome (if this card does not beat the highest so far, which is held by the other side)

Keep going around the room until you get back to the caller, who reveals her remaining card(s).

With all cards drawn and narrated, the player with the high card concludes the description by describing the final outcome.

(As the King of Spades is the highest card and can’t be beaten, its appearance prompts an exception to the rules. A player revealing it narrates an immediate end to the action sequence, in her favor.)

Example: Ava, the caller, reveals a 4 of Diamonds. The first card is always the high card when drawn, so she says: “The village is on fire! The Horseheads come riding in.”

Darius, on her left, wants the village to repel the attack and has paid a bennie for an extra card. He reveals the 8 of Clubs. That’s better than Ava’s card, so he describes events turning the village’s way: “Using Tallbeard’s training, the people spring into action, flinging sling bullets at the hated foe.” He turns over his second card, an 8 of Diamonds: “The Horsenecks break formation, and the people cheer!” (Suit order tells us that this is the new high card.)

Bob, on his left, reveals the 6 of Clubs, worse than the highest card so far. He has to describe events going against his desires, which favor of the invasion: “Even our smallest children join in the defense, pelting the invaders with well-aimed stones.”

Carla, on his left, reveals the 9 of Clubs, the best card so far. She favors the invasion: “Then their mightiest warriors regroup, sending our hurlers fleeing with terrifying swings of their great bronze war clubs.”

Emily turns over the Jack of Spades, now the best card. Opposing the invasion, she says: “Our best fighters, Tallbeard excepted, clash with theirs, sending them toppling from their mounts.”

Fran shows her card, the 7 of Diamonds. That’s not the best card but she’s with Emily in wanting the invasion to fail, so she gets to describe a positive result. “Seeing this, the Horseneck auxiliaries flee.”

That takes us around the room back to the caller, Ava. If she draws a Queen or King, she can turn this back to her original intent. But she only gets a 10 of Clubs, and must describe an opposite step: “Still on horseback, our war leaders herd the downed Horsenecks past our fortifications.”

As owner of the high card, Emily gets the final narrative touch: “We jeer them, hurling dung and insults, as they limp back toward their dry and wretched lands.”

As in the quick narration example, Ava, the caller, then revises her intention of the ensuing scene. Her character, Ashwind, still goes to Tallbeard. Now, however, she uses a bit of tribal reverse psychology, congratulating him on training the others so that his own hands don’t get bloody any more.

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